Fall 2005

September 29 - October 6


Thursday, september 29

8:00 PM

 

  • THE BIG IDEA #1: YOUR FRIENDS AND NEIGHBOURS
    Controversial and outspoken, former US ambassador to Canada Paul Cellucci reflects on our complex relationship both in terms of trade and foreign affairs in his characteristically open and forthright fashion. Join Jim Creskey, publisher of The Hill Times and senior editor at Embassy, for an evening with Paul Cellucci that examines all the issues that unite and divide Canadians and Americans. Don't miss the opportunity to learn more about the Ambassador, whose unique brand of diplomacy was loved by some Canadians and hated by others but left no one indifferent.

FriDAY, september 30

6:00 PM

 

 


  • BEYOND THE WALLS OF THE NURSERY: CELEBRATING HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN'S BICENTENNIAL
    Celebrate Hans Christian Andersen's Bicentennial with "Beyond the Walls of the Nursery," an illustrated lecture by Dr. Hans Möller, followed by a piano and poetry recital by "Canada's Ambassador of Scandinavian Music," Derek Yaple-Schobert.

7:30 PM

 

 

 

 

 


  • WRITING LIFE #1
    Internationally acclaimed author Charlotte Gray hosts an evening of great Canadian fiction, featuring conversation and readings from: The Time in Between, the latest acclaimed novel from Winnipeg's David Bergen, finalist for the 2002 Governor General's Award; Off Centre, the first collection of stories from Ottawa's Caroline Shephard who was shortlisted for the Chapters/Robertson Davies first novel award; An Audience of Chairs, the latest novel from Newfoundland's Joan Clark, a Cape Breton story which Quill & Quire recently described as "elegantly written and deeply grounded in place"; and The Wreckage, an epic novel by internationally acclaimed poet and novelist Michael Crummey that transports readers across time and space from the austere shores of Newfoundland to Japanese POW camps during the Second World War.

9:30 PM

  • POLITICAL PUNK
    CPAC's Ken Rockburn sits down with political strategist Warren Kinsella to discuss his colourful, no-holds-barred look at punk rock and how it has influenced him and millions of other kids to strive for nothing less than changing the world. In Fury's Hour, Warren Kinsella searches for the soul of a sound that invigorated the way he and millions of others have grown up - a way that transformed anger into energy.

saturDAY, october 1

11:00 AM

 

 

 

  • STORYTELLING AND THE ORAL TRADITION
    Canada's best-known storyteller, Dan Yashinsky, lives his life as both teller and listener, and shows how storytelling can and does create vital connections between individuals, communities and families. By turns humorous, inspiring, instructive and philosophical, Dan shows us that stories, like love, mean the most when we give them away.

12:00-5:00 PM

 

 

 

  • THE WORDLOUNGE WORKSHOP
    www.thewordlounge.com is a popular online creative writing workshop guided by Eliza Clark and Marnie Woodrow. Now you can join them in person for this one-day intensive and entertaining workshop for creative writers who enjoy a challenge, as well as the chance to meet other writers in your community. Writing exercises, discussion of craft and the business of writing will make for an exciting afternoon; bring reliable pens and paper, you'll need them.

12:00-5:00 PM

 

 

 

 

  • LADY FRANKLIN'S REVENGE: AMBITION, OBSESSION, AND THE REMAKING OF ARCTIC HISTORY
    Bestselling author Ken McGoogan delivers a multi-media presentation on a remarkable historical figure. Denied a role in Victorian England's male-dominated society, Jane Franklin (1791-1875) took her revenge by seizing control of that most masculine of pursuits, Arctic exploration, and shaping its history to her own ends. Arguably the greatest woman traveller of the 19th century, Lady Franklin orchestrated an unprecedented 12-year search for Sir John Franklin, her husband, who disappeared in the Arctic in 1845.

1:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

  • THE WAY OF THE SCREENWRITER
    Screenwriter, director and author, Amnon Buchbinder joins Tom Shoebridge, founder of the Canadian Screen Training Centre and the Summer Institute of Film and Television for an in-depth session. Buchbinder draws on his knowledge as a teacher and his experience as a script doctor and a story editor to explore this creative process. Along the way he illustrates principles often inspired by the philosophy of Laozi (Lao Tze) with examples drawn from major motion pictures such as Memento and The Piano. For the beginning or seasoned screenwriter who aspires to more than mere competence, Buchbinder illuminates a path towards mastery of the craft. For the lover of the cinematic experience, he opens a curtain to reveal a rarely seen world behind the big screen.

2:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

  • THE BIG IDEA #2: DO CORPORATIONS RULE THE WORLD?
    Why is television so awful? Why do drug companies hide unfavourable test results? Why do automakers market unsafe cars? Why is our environment poisoning us? Why is our food so unhealthy? Why are we working sixty-hour weeks? Join the discussion with Wade Rowland, renowned professor and bestselling author of Greed, Inc.: Why Corporations Rule Our World and How We Let It Happen, and host Madelaine Drohan, award-winning journalist and bestselling author of Making a Killing: How and Why Corporations Use Armed Force to Do Business.

3:30 PM

 

 

 

 

 

  • THE BIG IDEA #3: WAR, BIG OIL, AND THE BATTLE FOR THE PLANET
    CPAC's Ken Rockburn sits down for an in-depth conversation with Linda McQuaig, whose incendiary book It's the Crude, Dude examines how the world's most powerful industry and history's most lethal army are having their way with the planet. Her scathing and razor-sharp assaults on fiscal policy (Shooting the Hippo), Free Trade (The Quick and the Dead), and the Canadian tax system (Behind Closed Doors), have won her a legion of dedicated readers. In It's the Crude, Dude, she turns her attention to a truly planetary issue: the cataclysmic effects our addiction to oil is having on our environment and our ability to co-exist in the world.

5:30 PM

 

 

 

  • HOW THE FRENCH ALMOST CONQUERED NORTH AMERICA
    History, travelogue, and memoir combine in this study of the great explorer, Sieur de La Salle. The Ottawa Citizen's Graham Green in conversation with Philip Marchand on his most recent book, Ghost Empire, a personal and historical quest in which he retraces the seventeenth-century explorations of La Salle while he searches in the present day for vestiges of France's lost North American legacy.

7:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • THE WRITING LIFE #2
    Join your host, acclaimed Ottawa author Geoffrey Brown, for an evening of great international fiction featuring conversation on the Writing Life and readings from: an endearing marvel of narrative invention and drive in The Beautiful Wife by Governor General's Award winner Leon Rooke; a humorous and heartbreaking story of three generations of an Israeli family from Edeet Ravel in A Wall of Light; The Radiant City, in which Lauren B. Davis shines light into the no-man's-land of war zones, Paris's unseen quarters, and the darkest corners of the human mind and heart; and The Crimson Petal and the White, the story of a young woman in an extraordinary world, whose desires and dreams clash violently with the time and place she must inhabit, by international bestselling author Michel Faber.

7:00 PM

 

  • HIPPIE CAMPFIRE IN CONCERT
    Discover the music of Hippie Campfire. Celebrate the global reach of their new web-site and be the first to hear songs from the long-awaited new album. A night of high-energy Rock, R & B, Folk, Country, Blues and Soul.


SUNday, OCTOBER 2

11:00 AM

 

 

 

 

 

 


  • DEAD ALIVE WITH MURRAY WILSON
    This year's Dead Alive deals with the act of translation, specifically the translation of "Au Lecteur," that famous address to the Reader that also serves as a preface of sorts to Charles Baudelaire's collection of poetry, Les fleurs du mal. Time has proved that "Au Lecteur" and its collection of iconoclastic poetry, (it wasn't wrought in our age!) wrought during the age of Napoleon III, is still relevant now in our age of transcendental mediocrity, inspissate kakistocracy and delusions of excellence with our Greed Mongers, Defrauders and others whose maws bloat in the troughs of Blind Opportunism. But what about the unilingual reader who wishes to taste if not indeed digest these Flowers of Evil? What can she/he avail himerself of? Murray not only examines a number of English translations of this poem; he also shows that another language altogether, Mandarin in this case, provides the attentive reader with a feast of delightful heuristical opportunities-if only because Mandarin employs an ideograph and not a word to translate the French.

12:00-5:00 PM

 

 

 


  • THE WORDLOUNGE WORKSHOP
    www.thewordlounge.com is a popular online creative writing workshop guided by Eliza Clark and Marnie Woodrow. Now you can join them in person for this one-day intensive and entertaining workshop for creative writers who enjoy a challenge, as well as the chance to meet other writers in your community. Writing exercises, discussion of craft and the business of writing will make for an exciting afternoon; bring reliable pens and paper, you'll need them.

12:30 PM

 

 

 

  • POETIC MEMORY
    CPAC's Ken Rockburn talks family, writing, travel, sex and death in the context of the real-life adventures of Susan Musgrave. Equally at home recounting the lore of her outlaw husband, Stephen Reid, or interpreting the arcane rituals of her teenage girls, Musgrave brings to her literary essays that same invigorating freshness for which her fiction and poetry are known.

2:00 PM

 

 

 

  • APPETITE FOR DESTRUCTION: CONFESSIONS OF A FOOD ADDICT
    Broadcaster Dave Stephens welcomes acclaimed British journalist and author William Leath. Educational and intimate, hysterical and terrifying, his new book, The Hungry Years: Confessions of a Food Addict, provides an unblinking look at the physical consequences and psychological pain of being overweight and charts fascinating new territory for everyone who has ever had a craving or counted a calorie.

2:00 PM

 

 

 

  • BOOK LAUNCH: THE DIARY OF ABRAHAM ULRIKAB
    In August 1880, businessman Adrian Jakobsen convinced eight Inuit men, women, and children from Hebron and Nakvak, Labrador, to accompany him to Europe to be "exhibited" in zoos and ethnographic shows. They agreed, partly for the money and partly out of curiosity to see the wonders of Europe, which they had heard about from the Moravian missionaries. By January 1881, all eight had died in Europe of smallpox.

2:00 PM

 

 

  • JAPAN BEFORE, SINCE AND BEYOND HIROSHIMA AND NAGASAKI
    An engaging overview of Japanese culture and history by Professor Jacob Kovalio, founder and organizer of Carleton University's annual Japan Evening.

5:00 PM

 

 

 

 

  • POETRY CABARET #1
    Live poetry and a little conversation with three of Canada's most acclaimed wordsmiths, Governor General's Award winners all. Teacher and poet Murray Wilson hosts readings from: Hot Poppies, Leon Rooke's collection of seductive and subversive five-line love lyrics, full of epigrammatic spark, intersperse vitriolic satires on American electoral antics; Whetstone, Lorna Crozier's darkly resonant poems of middle age: alert to the beauty in loss, cherishing the humanity that is whetted on that stone; and Don McKay's latest set of acclaimed variations on poetics of place, Deactivated West 100.

7:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • WRITING LIFE #3
    The Ottawa Citizen's Kate Heartfield hosts an evening of acclaimed prose featuring conversation on the Writing Life and readings from: Shani Mootoo's He Drown She in the Sea a vividly evoked, subtly described story of love, class division, and the unrelenting hold of the past, told by one of our most gifted writers; Shooting Water, narrative non-fiction from Devyani Saltzman, a chronicle of a life-changing experience in India with her mother, filmmaker Deepa Mehta, and the emergence of a deeper love and mutual recognition between mother and daughter through the struggle to produce a film; The Walking Boy, by Vancouver psychologist and writer Lydia Kwa, set in the year 702 during the Tang Dynasty reign of China's only female emperor; and Camilla Gibb's Sweetness In the Belly, recently described in the Ottawa Citizen as "a marvelous, highly absorbing read" and praised by critics coast to coast.

9:00 PM

 

  • PLANN 99 POETRY CABARET
    The Writers Festival is thrilled to be collaborating with the PLANN 99 Reading Series in presenting this evening of cutting edge international poetry curated and hosted by David O'Meara, acclaimed poet and co-founder of the PLANN 99. Rambunctious, witty, joyous, and bittersweet, drift by Kevin Connolly, explores what it is to confront a new century, having quite likely failed during the last; in Past Imperfect, the debut collection by Suzanne Buffam, the winner of the 1998 CBC Literary Award, offers poems of great intensity, driven by intelligence, tracing the barely knowable contours of a soul-in-progress; Srikanth Reddy's internationally acclaimed debut, Facts for Visitors, re-negotiates the impasse between traditional and experimental approaches to writing in contemporary American poetry.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 3

6:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

  • BOMBAY LOST AND FOUND
    Spend some quality time with Suketu Mehta in conversation about MaxiMum City: Bombay Lost and Found, praised by the New York Times as "narrative reporting at its finest, probably the best work of nonfiction to come out of India in recent years". Harper's Magazine, recommends Mehta's work, calling it "dazzling and absorbing.... He makes virtually any other reporting on India look pallid by comparison." A finalist for the 2005 Pulitzer Prize, winner of the 2005 Kiriyama Prize, and praised by critics the world over, it was chosen as a Book of the Year by numerous publications, including The Economist, India Today and The Library Journal, which described Suketu's writing as "part travelog, part cultural history, this vibrant portrait is greater than the sum of its parts."

7:30 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • WRITING LIFE #4
    An evening of acclaimed Canadian prose with an international flavour, featuring conversation on the Writing Life and readings from: Wayson Choy's stunning evocation of Vancouver's Chinatown, All That Matters, the 2005 Trillium Book Award winner, which the Globe and Mail praised as "a thing of sheer beauty"; Lawrence Osgood's epic novel of the Canadian Arctic, Beneath the Midnight Sun, which unfolds across the tundra wilderness, in an Inuit village, on the moon, and under the sea; a series of linked stories by Jaspreet Singh that revolve around two Sikh boys coming of age in an Indian army camp in Kashmir, Seventeen Tomatoes, winner of the 2004 Mcaslan First Book Prize for what the Quebec Writers Federation calls "pitch-perfect prose"; and The Unyielding Clamour of the Night, Neil Bissoondath's controversial new novel, which examines terrorism from an intimate perspective that reveals the brutal and lasting affects of violence.

9:30 PM

  • POETRY CABARET #2
    The Co-Champion of last year's Battle of the Sonnets, award-winning poet Stephen Brockwell, hosts an evening of vibrant and diverse poetic voices. Bing He's work in Alphabet Zen, is rooted in Zen, Taoism, and traditional Chinese poetry, and influenced by modern Western movements such as Surrealism and Expressionism; Michel Thérien's recent translations into English, The Wilderness Within/Corps Sauvage, lies at the raw edge of reality where nature, depicted as wild and teeming with beauty, is a force to be reckoned with; and Susan Musgrave, one of Canada's most publicized and popular writers offers work that travels from witchcraft to wilderness, from First Nations to the urban nation, and from the erotic to the exotic.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4

6:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

  • MORTALITY AND CREATIVITY
    Don't miss this life-affirming true story with profound insight into love, creativity and all that matters from Trillium Award winning author Wayson Choy, whose first novel, The Jade Peony, spent 26 weeks on The Globe and Mail's bestseller list. Find out what changed when Wayson, working on his latest novel, All That Matters, had a severe asthma attack, which led to a coma, during which he had more than one heart attack. As he recovered, he gradually discovered how terrible it had been for his friends and family, leading Wayson to ponder the power of simple acts of decency, and the "deeper level of connection between people."

7:00 PM

 

 


  • CANADA POST LITERACY AWARDS CEREMONY
    The Writers Festival is proud to host the 2005 Canada Post Literacy Awards Ceremony, celebrating the accomplishment of some truly inspirational Ontarians, winners in Individual Achievement, Keith Allen from North Bay and Gaston Betty from Verner and Constance Morgan, founder of the Barrie Literacy Council winner in the Educator category. Kitchener Waterloo English School, Waterloo, and H'Art Studio, Kingston, are the deserving winners of the Community Leadership Award.

7:30 PM

 

 

 


  • BROKEN ENGLISH THEATRE PRESENTS: BAGGAGE
  • Early in 2005, Broken English Theatre held its annual writing competition, open to all new and first-generation Canadians, both youth and adults. The theme of the competition was baggage. Entries reflect some of the adjustments that have to be made by new Canadians who, like people that move into a small town, are still considered new after twenty years. This fall The Writers Festival is proud to host Baggage by Dora Award winning playwright Bryan James. This short play, based on some of the entries, looks at life in a luggage museum.

8:00 PM

 

 



  • TREE READING SERIES
    Join the Festival in raising a glass to the TREE Reading Series! Current organizers and recent anthologists Jennifer Mulligan and James Moran host the 25th Anniversary Celebration for Ottawa's oldest reading series. Open mike, special musical guest John Lavery and featured readings from: legendary poet Jane Jordan; Journey Prize and Upper Canada Writer's Craft Award winning prose from Gabriella Goliger; and Governor General's Award nominee Mark Frutkin, equally fluent in poetry and prose.

 


WEDNEsday, OCTOBER 5

5:30 PM

 

 

 

 

  • BOOK LAUNCH: SASKATCHEWAN: A NEW HISTORY
    Join us in celebrating the launch of Saskatchewan: A New History, a deluxe commemorative publication for the provincial centennial in 2005. Award-winning Canadian historian and University of Saskatchewan professor Bill Waiser tells stories about people against the larger backdrop of provincial events and issues since 1905. It is a celebration of what makes Saskatchewan special, as well as a critical look at the sources of the province's many challenges today.

7:30 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • WRITING LIFE #5
    The Ottawa Citizen's Kate Heartfield hosts an evening of acclaimed Canadian fiction featuring conversation on the Writing Life and readings from: Kristen Den Hartog's third novel, Origin of Haloes, unfolds in Olympic-year intervals, and was recommended as "a haunting, heart-rending masterpiece" by George Elliot Clark; Anne DeGrace's debut, Treading Water, a novel in twelve stories, traces a community from its innocent beginnings until the day the waters rise for a new hydroelectric dam; Ray Robertson's Gently Down the Stream, a novel about dogs, monogamy and karaoke, was praised by Paul Quarrington as "witty and wise, a gentle yet deep probing into the complexities of the human heart"; internationally renowned author Joan Barfoot returns with Luck, an acclaimed novel that Alice Munro calls "sharp and surprising ... so satisfying."

9:30 PM

 

 

 

  • BYWORDS'S JOHN NEWLOVE POETRY AWARD CELEBRATION
    Join us for the launch of Dust Free by Norma Elliot. This is the first of a planned series of chapbooks written by Newlove Poetry Award recipients. The celebration includes the announcement of the 2005 winner as selected by well-known Canadian poet Stuart Ross, readings from John Newlove's poetry, music by local singer Lee Hayes, who is best known as one-quarter of Canada's top A Cappella group Malaika.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6

6:00 PM

 

 

 


  • STORYKEEPERS: CONVERSATIONS WITH ABORIGINAL WRITERS
    Jennifer David hosts the unofficial launch of her book, Story Keepers: Conversations with Aboriginal Writers, discussing Aboriginal literature and live readings from four of the acclaimed writers featured in the book: Ottawa's Armand Garnet Ruffo, Anishnabe (Ojibway) from Northern Ontario; Louise Halfe, Cree, from Saskatchewan; Ruby Slipperjack-Farrell, Anishnabe (Ojibway) from northwestern Ontario; and Gregory Scofield, Métis, from the West coast.

7:30 PM

 

 

 

 

 


  • WRITING LIFE #6
    Broadcaster Lucy van Oldenbarneveld hosts an evening of internationally acclaimed Canadian fiction, featuring conversation on the Writing Life and readings from: Varda Burstyn's Water Inc., which Kirkus describes as "a prescient and illuminating thriller. A flustering cautionary tale, rolling with intrigue and suspense"; Charles Foran offers a trip to famine-ravaged Ireland with Terence Carolan, a legendary blind composer and harper in Carolan's Farewell; A Perfect Pledge, the moving, funny and captivating new novel by Rabindranath Maharaj, takes us to a village in Trinidad where an irascible cane farmer continually plots to improve life for his family and contemporaries, much to their dismay; and Katherine Govier's profound reflections on nature-both earthly and human-infuse Three Views of Crystal Water, a lucid and exotic tale that is part fable, part history and entirely original.

9:30 PM

  • POETRY CABARET #3: SPOTLIGHT ON COACH HOUSE BOOKS
    In celebration of the 40th Anniversary of Coach House Books, still located on Toronto's historic bpNichol Lane, the Writers Festival is proud to complete its 2005 Fall Edition with four amazing Coach House poets. ARC Magazine's Anita Lahey hosts: Toronto's Stephen Cain reading from American Standard/Canada Dry; Montreal's Sherwin Tjia sharing from The World Is a Heartbreaker, his collection of 1600 pseudo haikus; Toronto's ReLit Award for Poetry winner Margaret Christakos shares work from Sooner and Excessive Love Prostheses; and Shannon Bramer unveils the fable-like miniature stories and short lyric poems of her third collection, The Refrigerator Memory, and its world of stolen pears and prosthetic arms inhabited by kindness, scientists and hot-air balloon operators.
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