Spring 2006

April 17-23: Turning the Page


monday, April 17

5:30 PM

 

 

  • DINNER
    Join us at the Library for a delicious meal provided by
    Jaipur Bistro, 349 Dalhousie Street, for just $8

7:00 PM

 

 

 

 

  • MODERN FAITH AND THE HISTORICAL JESUS
    "Tom Harpur is one of the wisest spiritual guides in contemporary culture."
    - Larry Dossey MD, Author

    Tom Harpur, author of the bestseller, The Pagan Christ, points the way towards a new understanding of how we can be fully human within our changing lives. Sharing from his new book, Living Waters, he explores our search for spiritual meaning.

7:00 PM

 

  • POETRY CABARET #1
    Celebrate National Poetry Month with two-time Governor General's Award winner Nicole Brossard, acclaimed poet and Trillium nominee Kevin Connolly, and Atlantic Poetry Prize winner Ken Babstock.

    "An explorer of language...a demanding and unarguably original oeuvre."
    - Lettres Québécoises on Nicole Brossard
    "Huge imaginative leaps. Driven by surreal imagery and associative wordplay."
    - Quill & Quire on Kevin Connolly
    "An energy - like measured amounts of linguistic adrenaline."
    - Simon Armitage on Ken Babstock


TUESDAY, APRIL 18

7:00 PM

 

 

 


  • MY HEART IS AFRICA
    Ten years ago, businessman Scott Griffin broke from the routine of his life to work for the Flying Doctors Service, an organization that flies doctors to remote areas to administer medical assistance. He flew his single-engine Cessna 180 solo from Canada to Africa and back. Join him for his unforgettable journey across Africa and his encounters with the doctors, nurses, aid workers and eccentric characters that crossed his path along the way.

8:30 PM

 

 

 

  • THE BIG IDEA #1: IS GOD A MAN?
    In most monotheistic traditions, God is presented as a father figure, but what of the feminine aspect of the divine? Does God really have a gender?

    Join Tim Ward, bestselling author of What the Buddha Never Taught, acclaimed novelist and passionate student of world religions, Anne Hines, and Tom Harpur, Rhodes Scholar and former Anglican priest, for an engaging conversation on spirituality, gender and our relationship with the divine.


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 19

5:30 PM

 

  • DINNER
    Join us at the Library for a delicious meal provided by
    Ristorante La Dolce Vita, 180 Preston Street for just $8

7:00 PM

 

 

 

  • ONE MAN'S SEARCH FOR THE GODDESS
    Don't miss this real-life Da Vinci Code quest for the lost sacred feminine. For thousands of years men have been cut off from the feminine divine. How does this affect their relationships with women? During a three-year journey to reconnect with the lost goddesses of his ancestors, Tim Ward explored the ruined temples and shrines of the sacred feminine, encountering the goddess in all her forms. In this interactive event, he recounts his experiences with these powerful divinities.

8:30 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • WRITING LIFE #1
    Celebrate a new generation of Canadian fiction: Certainty, the acclaimed first novel by award-winner Madeleine Thien; Baby Khakis Wings, stories set in Canada and East Africa by Anar Ali; and The Birth House, the bestselling debut by Ami McKay.

    "I am astonished by the clarity and ease of the writing, and a kind of emotional purity."
    - Alice Munro on Madeline Thien
    "A loving and rich portrait... A dazzling debut."
    - Shyam Selvadurai on Anar Ali
    "A tale of sex, birth, love and pain that will more than satisfy the hungry reader."
    - Joan Clark on Ami McKay


THURSDAY APRIL 20

5:30 AM

 


  • DINNER
    Join us at the Library for a delicious meal provided by
    Sitar Indian Restaurant, 417 Rideau Street, for just $8

7:00 PM

 

 


  • BECKETT 100: BECKETT ALL!
    Don't miss Deasil & Widdershins' inaugural performance. The troupe is composed of John Lavery, Max Middle and Carmel Purkis. Deasil & Widdershins will be presenting a series of literary readings based on the short fiction of Samuel Beckett.

7:00 PM

 

 

 

 

  • MEET JOSEPHINE COX
    "Driven and passionate."
    - Sunday Times

    Following the fortunes of the much-loved characters from her No.1 bestseller The Journey, Josephine Cox's powerful new novel, Journey's End, spans continents, decades and generations of one family. Don't miss the opportunity to meet one of England's most beloved storytellers.

8:30 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • WRITING LIFE #2
    An evening of acclaimed fiction with an international flavour: The Moonlit Cage, set in 1850's Afghanistan, the latest from Linda Holeman; The Violin Lover, set in 1930's Europe, the debut novel from acclaimed poet Susan Glickman; and The Shape I Gave You, a story of memory and the weight of guilt from Martha Baillie.

    "Well-paced, creative and addictive."
    - Winnipeg Free Press on Linda Holeman
    "One of the finest of the new generation of Canadian writers."
    - The Journal of Commonwealth Literature on Susan Glickman
    "Haunting... Full of finely wrought detail."
    - Bronwyn Drainie on Martha Baillie

8:30 PM

 

 

 

 

  • BECKETT 100: SAMUEAL BECKETT FILM FESTIVAL: WAITING FOR GODOT
    Beckett wrote Waiting for Godot in French in 1949. In the first scene, two men, Vladimir and Estragon, wait on a lonely country road for an appointment with Godot. After a while Pozzo enters, leading Lucky on a rope. They talk. Godot fails to arrive. The second scene is a mirror image of the first. The Irish critic Vivian Mercier called Waiting for Godot a play in which "nothing happens, twice".

FRIDAY, APRIL 21

NOON

 

 

 

 

 

  • BECKETT 100: SAMUEL BECKETT FILM FESTIVAL: KRAPP'S LAST TAPE
    In Krapp's Last Tape, which was written in English in 1958, an old man reviews his life and assesses his predicament. We learn about him not from the 69-year-old man on stage, but from his 39-year-old self on the tape he chooses to listen to. On the "awful occasion" of his birthday, Krapp was then and is now in the habit of reviewing the past year and "separating the grain from the husks". He isolates memories of value, fertility and nourishment to set against creeping death, "when all my dust has settled".

5:00 PM

 

 

 

  • THE ART OF WINE TASTING
    Don't miss the opportunity to enhance your appreciation of fine wine under the expert guidance of seasoned wine, food and travel writer and broadcaster Konrad Ejbich. A regular wine commentator for CBC Radio's Ontario Today, he will entertain and educate as he leads the tasting of two specially selected Ontario vintages.

5:30 PM

 

 

  • DINNER
    Join us at the Library for a delicious meal provided by
    Memories Restaurant, 7 Clarence Street, for just $8

7:00 PM

  • THE IMPOSSIBLE LOGIC OF WAR
    "If you want to understand how and why the U.S. is in Iraq, start here."
    - Halifax Chronicle Herald

    Journalist and author Paul William Roberts picks up where he left off with A War against Truth, his first-hand account of the invasion of Iraq. With recent articles on the Prophet, and a look at a possible invasion of Iran, this event is a must for anyone with an interest in the Middle East.

9:30 PM

  • POETRY CABARET #2
    An evening of cutting-edge Canadian poetry that runs the gamut from A. Rawlings' poetic fantasia, to John McDonald's celebration of discovering one's place in the world, to Gary Barwin's fusion of the absurd with pure poetic passion.

    "Luminous with intelligence, vivacity and beauty."
    - Steve Venright on A. Rawlings
    "A brilliant fusion of the brutality and hope that is inherent in the Aboriginal experience."
    - Darrell Dennis on John McDonald
    "Pure entertainment, surreal, breathtaking, and beautiful."
    - Word on Gary Barwin


saturday april 22

NOON

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • THE HISTORY AND FUTURE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE
    "It would be hard to imagine a better or more important book."
    - Bill Bryson

    In The Weather Makers, Tim Flannery argues passionately for the urgent need to address - NOW - the implications of a global climate change that is damaging all life on earth and endangering our very survival. Our Earth Day programming begins with a global call to arms, laying out plainly if not controversially what we know, what we think might happen, and what tools we have available to us to make a difference.

  • Join us at the Library for fair-trade coffee and delicious baked goods provided by Harvest Loaf Bakery

2:00 PM

 

 

 


  • BECKETT 100: FIRST LOVE
    Padraig Finlay's performance is extracted from Samuel Beckett's First Love, a man's musings about his youth, occasioned by his visit to his father's grave. The work is described by Christopher Ricks as "The cracked and crackling narrator of First Love, who tells how he met a woman on a bench, went back to live with her, and left her as she was giving birth to his child... has all the pertinacity of the bone-deep fatigue that give Beckett's decrepit figures (ruined leech-gatherers) their ruthless strength, their rigor, not mortis but of moribundity."

2:00 PM

 

 

 

 


  • FIVE MONTHS ON FOOT IN THE ARCTIC
    "One of the best, most evocative, and hard-hitting accounts of man's inhumanity toward life, and of the need for reconciliation between man and the rest of animate creation."
    - Farley Mowat

    On April 8, 2003, Karsten Heuer and Leanne Allison left the remote community of Old Crow, Yukon, to join the porcupine caribou herd on their epic life journey. For five months, they migrated on foot with the 123,000-member herd from wintering to calving grounds in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and back again - 1,500 kilometres across snow and tundra. This multi-media presentation is a passionate and personal response to one of the foremost environmental issues in North America.

2:30 PM

 

 



  • BECKETT 100: SAMUEL BECKETT FILM FESTIVAL: HAPPY DAYS
    Written in English and considered Beckett's most cheerful piece, Happy Days features a woman buried up to her waist in a mound of sand. Winnie's husband, Willie, appears only occasionally from his tunnel behind the mound. Winnie's opening words, "Another heavenly day", set the tone for a long monologue, which lasts until she can no longer busy herself with the contents of her enormous handbag.

4:00 PM

 

 

 



  • WHEN THE RIVERS RUN DRY WITH FRED PEARCE
    When the Rivers Run Dry is a journey into the world water crisis. Internationally acclaimed writer and water authority Fred Pearce traverses the globe in this eye-opening portrait of what is fast becoming the planet's most serious potential catastrophe. From Canada and Texas to India and Palestine, he examines how galloping, unregulated consumption, economic greed and political indifference are putting the world's water systems at grave risk. Don't miss this engrossing overview of the impending water crisis and what we can do to avert a global disaster.

5:30 PM



  • DINNER
    Join us at the Library for a delicious meal provided by
    Green Door Vegetarian Restaurant, 198 Main Street, for just $8

6:00 PM

 



  • BECKETT 100: WATT NOW
    Celebrate the centenary of Samuel Beckett with a special presentation by one of the most important poets writing in English today. Hot on the heels of his participation in the official centenary celebrations in Dublin, poet and professor Paul Muldoon examines a towering figure in 20th century world literature.

8:00 PM

 

 



  • THE BIG IDEA #2: OUR UNNATURAL RELATIONSHIP WITH NATURE AND THE FUTURE OF LIFE ON EARTH
    Three of Canada's finest minds examine our relationship with nature. Wayne Grady's Bringing Back the Dodo delves into the forces of evolution and extinction that shape the living world. Terry Glavin's Waiting for the Macaws chronicles the history of extinctions and the human struggle to conserve living things and Elizabeth May's How to Save the World in Your Spare Time gives us the tools we need to protect our communities and the planet.

SUNDAY, APRIL 23

NOON

 

 

 

  • JOURNEY OF THE MAGI: IN SEARCH OF THE BIRTH OF JESUS
    From Iran, through Iraq, Syria, and Jordan to Israel and Palestine, Paul William Roberts takes us on a journey that is at once entertaining and enlightening, a journey that is guaranteed to challenge the seeker and infuriate the traditionalist.
  • Join us at the Library for fair-trade coffee and delicious baked goods provided by Harvest Loaf Bakery

2:00 PM

 

 

 

 

  • NARRATIVE NON-FICTION: THE WRITER AS CHARACTER
    An inside look at two very different and hugely compelling stories of self-examination in the wake of tragedy: Advertising executive Richard Clewes embarks on a globe-trotting journey of self-discovery in the aftermath of his wife's suicide in the memoir Finding Lilly, and acclaimed novelist Linda Spalding returns to autobiographical documentary in Who Named the Knife: A Book of Murder and Memory, an intimate portrait of two lives linked over decades.

4:00 PM

 

 

 

 

  • CRIMINAL MINDS
    Barbara Fradkin, winner of the 2005 Arthur Ellis Award, hosts three of the genre's leading authors. José Latour, one of the Spanish-speaking world's top writers makes his Canadian debut with Havana Best Friends; Maureen Jennings, Canada's answer to Anne Perry, shares her latest Detective Murdoch Mystery, Vices of My Blood; and bestselling author John Brady introduces a new series featuring Austrian Inspektor Felix Kimmel in Poacher's Road.

5:30 PM

 

 

  • DINNER
    Join us at the Library for a delicious meal provided by
    Il Primo Ristorante, 371 Preston Street, for just $8

6:00 PM

 

 

 

 

  • WRITING LIFE #3
    An evening of acclaimed first fictions hosted by Elizabeth Hay, winner of the Marian Engel Award. CBC Literary Award winner Alayna Munce's Trillium shortlisted first book, When I Was Young & in My Prime, is a poetic tour-de-force; Alison Pick, winner of the National Magazine Award for poetry, enters the world of fiction with her praised novel, The Sweet Edge; and popular columnist Leah McLaren's The Continuity Girl is the debut novel from one of our most prominent young voices.

8:00 PM

 

  • POETRY CABARET #3
    Stephen Brockwell hosts an unforgettable evening of internationally renowned poetry featuring Governor General's Award winner George Elliott Clarke, acclaimed newcomer A.J. Levin and Pulitzer Prize winner Paul Muldoon close the Spring Festival on a high note.
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