FALL EDITION 2007


saturday, OctoBER 13

8:00 PM

  • LITERARY AWARDS CEREMONY:
    THE OTTAWA BOOK AWARDS/ LE  PRIX DU LIVRE D'OTTAWA AND THE LAMPMAN-SCOTT AWARD FOR POETRY

    The City of Ottawa is pleased to celebrate Ottawa’s outstanding literary scene with the presentation of awards to authors in the amount of $5,000 for winning books in English fiction, English non-fiction and French fiction.

    The ceremony will be followed by a reception, featuring the music of Peter Hum and Mark Fraser.

    A free event. Donations support our free literacy programs.

    Congratualations to the nominees!

    English Fiction:
    Tom Henighan for Viking Terror
    Anita Lahey for Out to Dry in Cape Breton
    Janet Lunn for A Rebel's Daughter
    Monty Reid for Disappointment Island
    Barbara Sibbald for Regarding Wanda

    English Non-Fiction:
    John B. Dossetor for Beyond the Hippocratic Oath
    Graham Fraser for Sorry I Don't Speak French
    Charlotte Gray for Reluctant Genius: The Passionate Life and Inventive Mind of Alexander Graham Bell
    David Lee for Lumber Kings and Shantymen
    Alex Mortimer for The Quitter

    Création littéraire en français:
    Daniel Castillo Durante pour La passion des nomades
    Éric Charlebois for Cinérte
    Andrée Laurier pour Horizons navigables
    François Lepage pour Poupeska
    Daniel Poliquin pour La Kermesse

    The Lampman-Scott Award recognizes an outstanding book of English-language poetry by an Author living in the National Capital Region. This $1.500 prize is administered by ARC Poetry Society.

    The candidates are:

    Sylvia Adams for Sleeping on the Moon
    Ronnie R. Brown for Night Echoes
    Terry Ann Carter for Transplanted
    Michael Dennis for Arrows of Desire
    Oni the Haitian Sensation for Ghettostocracy
    Christopher Levenson for Local Time
    rob mclennan for aubade and name      ,an errant
    Monty Reid for Disappointment Island
    Grant D. Savage for Their White with Them

 


SuNday, October 14

Dinner today provided by La Dolce Vita Restaurant (180 Preston St.) at 5:30.

NOON

  • THE BIG IDEA: RENEWAL IN AN ERA OF SUDDEN CHANGE: CAN CANADA PROSPER IN THE 21ST CENTURY?
    Thomas Homer-Dixon in conversation with Neil Wilson


    In The Upside of Down, political scientist and award-winning author Thomas Homer-Dixon argues that converging stresses could cause a catastrophic breakdown of national and global order—a social earthquake that could hurt billions of people. But this breakdown could open up extraordinary opportunities for creative, bold reform of our societies. Join us for a discussion on hope and survival in a future full of surprises.

2:00 PM

  • THE BIG IDEA: MEETING CANADA'S CLIMATE CHANGE CHALLENGE
    Jeffrey Simpson in conversation with Kathleen Petty


    Join Jeffrey Simpson, co-author of Hot Air: Meeting Canada’s Climate Change Challenge for a candid discussion on the very real threat of climate change, how government, industry and environmentalists have betrayed us, and a prescription for change. Backed by evidence from other countries that are successfully addressing climate change, Simpson explores the simple policies that will work—and explains why this is a matter of life and death for all of us.

2:00 PM

  • GEORGE JOHNSTON MEMORIAL
    Featuring Robyn Sarah, John Metcalf, Mark Abley, Robert Hogg, Bill Hawkins and Stephen Brockwell


    Celebrate the life and work of George Johnston with recitals of his most memorable poems, reminiscences and a panel discussion. George Johnston is regarded by many as one of Canada?s pre-eminent poets. Educated at the University of Toronto, George Johnston became an RCAF reconnaissance pilot in Africa during the Second World War. After returning to the University of Toronto to comple his graduate studies, Johnston taught briefly at Mt. Allison University, and joined the faculty of Carleton University where he taught until his retirement in 1979. The publication of The Essential George Johnston will bring Johnston?s work to a new audience who will appreciate both the formal perfection of his verse and the verbal energy of his poetry as spoken word.

4:00 PM

  • THE BIG IDEA: THE END OF IGNORANCE: A NEW UNDERSTANDING OF HOW WE LEARN
    John Mighton in conversation with Shelley Page


    Author and educator John Mighton asks us to imagine a world in which no child is left behind—a world based on the assumption that each child has the potential to be successful in every subject—and shows how we all can work together to reinvent the way that we are taught. Join the conversation with the bestselling author of The Myth of Ability and The End of Ignorance and the founder of JUMP Math, a system of learning based on the fostering of emergent intelligence that has shown astonishing results with children, including so-called slow learners.

4:00 PM

  • THE ASSASSIN'S SONG: ONE ON ONE WITH M.G. VASSANJI
    Hosted by Mark Frutkin


    Two-time Giller Prize winnner M.G. Vassanji returns to his ancestral homeland in a sweeping and intimate novel that explores the burden of tradition on a young man growing up in modern India. The Assassin’s Song is an intricate portrait of a man caught between ancient loyalties and modern desires, between legacy and discovery, between the most daunting filial obligation and the most personal yearning. Join us for a taste of the story followed by an on-stage conversation and audience Q&A.

6:00 PM

  • WRITING LIFE #1
    Readings by Helen Humphreys, Shauna Singh Baldwin and Richard B. Wright

    On-stage conversation with Sean Wilson

    The Writing Life begins with three of Canda’s most respected storytellers. Helen Humphreys, winner of the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize and the Lambda Award for fiction, returns with The Frozen Thames a groundbreaking, genre-bending collection of forty vignettes based on actual events that took place each time the river froze between 1142 and 1895. Shauna Singh Baldwin, winner of the Commonwealth Writer’s Prize for Best Book in the Canada-Caribbean region, makes her Festival debut with We Are Not in Pakistan, a collection of ten stunning short stories whose characters are all displaced in some way, isolated or marginalized in unwelcoming cultures. Richard B. Wright, winner of the Giller Prize and the Governor General’s Award returns with his latest novel, October, which effortlessly weaves a haunting coming-of-age story set in World War II Quebec with a contemporary portrait of a man still searching for answers in the autumn of his life.

8:00 PM

  • THE SECOND ANNUAL METCALF-ROOKE AWARD
    Readings by John Metcalf, Leon Rooke and Kathleen Winter
    With music by Glenn Nuotio


    Join us in celebrating the Metcalf-Rooke Award, which upholds and celebrates the tradition of small press publishing and independent bookselling in Canada and champions the writing of new and up-and-coming Canadian writers. Legendary author and editor John Metcalf returns to the Festival with his latest, Shut Up He Explained, a bookthatdefies expectations and strict definition. Part memoir, part travelogue, part criticism, it is thoughtful, contentious and often very funny. Governor General’s Award Winner Leon Rooke returns to our stage with Hitting the Charts: Selected Stories, offering up the full range of his accomplished voice and pushing the boundaries of form and function. Newfoundland’s Kathleen Winter, winner of the 2007 Metcalf-Rooke Award, makes her Festival debut with boYs, a collection of stories about women’s hunger and men’s minds, and what survives when they collide.


Monday, October 15

Dinner today provided by La Roma Restaurant (430 Preston St.) at 5:30.

10:15 AM
and
1:00 PM

 

10:15 AM
and
1:00 PM

 

6:00 PM

  • POETIC POLITICS:
    GEORGE ELLIOTT CLARKE ON PIERRE ELLIOTT TRUDEAU


    A political caper, an extravagant portrait and a dramatic study of influence, power, revolution and liberation, George Elliott Clarke’s newest dramatic poem, Trudeau: Long March, Shining Path, originally composed as the libretto for a new opera by D.D. Jackson, is an irreverent, jubilant portrait of the life and politics of one of Canada’s most controversial political heroes.

7:00 PM

  • TRUDEAU THE MYSTIC
    B.W. Powe in conversation with Neil Wilson


    Philosopher, essayist, poet and novelist B.W. Powe, whose work has been praised by John Ralston Saul, Pico Iyer and Trudeau himself, offers us a meditation on the mysteries of Pierre Elliott Trudeau’s identity. He explores the extraordinary impact Trudeau continues to have on Canada by examining his hidden mystical and spiritual side —  which in turn raises questions about our own personal and collective mystic identities. Framed by a friendship with his subject, Powe’s new book, Mystic Trudeau: The Fire and The Rose, is a completely original philosophical examination of an enormously important Canadian public figure.

8:30 PM

  • BOOK LAUNCH: MY YEARS AS PRIME MINISTER
    Senator Jim Munson, Bruce Hartley and Daniel Poliquin on The Right Honourable Jean Chrétien
    Hosted by Ken Rockburn

    PLEASE NOTE: Mr. Chrétien is recuperating from his recent surgery and will not be attending the launch.

    Join us for an unforgettable and candid evening on Canada’s twentieth prime minister and his decade at 24 Sussex Drive. Longtime friends and colleagues Daniel Poliquin, Bruce Hartley and Senator Jim Munson discuss his memoir, My Years as Prime Minister, which describes how his government wiped out the deficit, helped to defeat the separatists in the cliffhanger Quebec referendum, passed the Clarity Act, and set out to fulfill the economic and social promises his party made in its famous Red Books. He reveals how and why he kept the country out of the war in Iraq—a defining moment for many Canadians; led Team Canada on whirlwind trade missions around the world; and participated in a host of major international summits.

    Along with his astute comments on politics and government, he gives us portraits of a broad cast of characters. Over a beer, Tony Blair confides his hesitation about taking Britain into the Iraq War; in the corridors of the United Nations, Bill Clinton offers to speak to Québecers on behalf of Canadian unity; while at home, Chrétien reveals the events leading up to the departure of his finance minister, Paul Martin.

8:30 PM

  • BYWORDS ANNUAL JOHN NEWLOVE AWARD

    This year’s winning poem “sustains a classic narrative visually, while also permitting taut and tantalizing wordplay. The poet crafts vivid, alive images, allows enjoyable contrasts, and interrupts expectations, thanks to choice line-breaks and enjambment. [The winning poem] is not only a ludic lyric; plain speech is also granted poetic power. It takes the John Newlove Award because its poet is fearless-adventuring, risking, and daring much, specifically in making the poem an art form, but one as adamantly accessible and as plastic as language itself. Its teasing nature renders it pleasing, and there is no treasure without pleasure.”
    —  George Elliott Clarke

    Join us for an evening of music; the announcement of this year’s winning poem; a reading by the winner and the honourable mentions; and the launch of Metafizz by Roland Prevost, last year’s John Newlove Award winner. John Carroll will also be performing his sultry acoustic folk and roots music.


Tuesday, October 16

Dinner today provided by The Table Vegetarian Restaurant (1230 Wellington St.) at 5:30.

10:30 AM

 

 

10:00 AM
and
1:30 PM

 

6:00 PM

  • INTERNATIONAL SPOTLIGHT: CÉLINE CURIOL
    Hosted by Mark Frutkin
    Presented by the Embassy of France


    Céline Curiol’s debut, Voice Over, is a haunting novel of obsessive love set on the streets of a Paris you’ve never seen. Recently published in the author’s native France to great acclaim, it appears now for the first time in English. Find out why this first-time novelist has been winning praise from some of the world’s finest writers and receiving rave reviews around the world.

7:00 PM

  • THE BIG IDEA: CROSSING THE ISRAEL/PALESTINE DIVIDE
    Jonathan Garfinkel in conversation with Adrian Harewood


    Poet and playwright Jonathan Garfinkel’s memoir Ambivalence begins when he hears a curious, touching story about a house in Jerusalem that is shared by a Palestinian and a Jew. As he starts to question the assumptions of his faith and Zionist teachings of his youth, he is impelled to make his first-ever trip to Israel— and the West Bank—and to confront the truths and myths of his upbringing. Join us for a conversation about connections and separations—about the perils of what links us and the distortions in what divides us.

8:30 PM

  • ACTIVISM 101: THE ART OF THE POSSIBLE
    Amanda Sussman in conversation with Kate Heartfield


    During her time with the United Nations and Amnesty International, and as human rights adviser to two federal cabinet ministers, Amanda Sussman was offered a unique bird’s-eye view of government machinations. In her book, The Art of the Possible, she demonstrates how working through government can be the most direct route to social progress. Having an impact is possible. It is a matter of knowing how government works and making sure your point of view is presented how and when it counts.

8:30 PM

  • THE TREE READING SERIES PRESENTS: MADNESS, IDENTITY AND REPRESSION
    Readings by Marilyn Bowering, Mary Borsky and Nadine McInnis
    On-stage conversation with Rhonda Douglas


    The Tree Reading Series presents Marilyn Bowering, winner of the Pat Lowther Award and the Ethel Wilson Prize, whose most recent publications are the poetry collection Green and the novel What It Takes To Be Human; Voted one of the “Most Loved Living Canadian Writers” by New Quarterly Magazine, Mary Borsky’s most recent book is a collection of stories, Cobalt Blue; and the Danuta Gleed Award and Ottawa Book Award Nominee, acclaimed for both poet and prose, Nadine McInnis, whose most recent book of poems is Two Hemispheres.


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17

Dinner today provided by Host India (622 Montreal Rd.) at 5:30.

11:00 AM
and
2:00 PM

 

10:15 AM
and
1:00 PM

 

10:15 AM
and
1:00 PM

 

1:00 PM

  • SECRETS OF THE WRITING LIFE
    With Michael Winter and David Gilmour


    Join us for a special Writing Life session with two of Canada’s finest literary talents—Newfoundland novelist Michael Winter and Governor Generals Award Winner, David Gilmour. Short readings will give us a taste of their work and will be followed by an on-stage conversation on the creative process and Canadian publishing, with plenty of time for audience questions.

6:00 PM

  • A TRIBUTE TO RYSZARD KAPUSCINSKI
    Featuring Scott Malcomson

    Presented with the Embassy of Poland


    Join author and editor Scott Malcomson in a tribute to one of the giants of contemporary journalism, who died earlier this year. Ryszard Kapuscinski, author of such seminal works as Travels with Herodotus, The Emperor: Downfall of an Autocrat, and Imperium among others, was one of the first journalists to bring us stories of the poor in Africa and Latin America as a correspondent from 1958 to the early 60’s and was one of the most influential practitioners of what became known as New Journalism. Kapuscinski wrote about real facts but used the techniques of fiction to capture the essence of his stories.

7:00 PM

  • THE FILM CLUB
    David Gilmour in conversation with Sean Wilson


    When David Gilmour realized that his 15-year-old son was miserable in school and on the verge of dropping out, he decided that his son could leave school on one conditionnot that he get a job or pay rent, but that he watch three movies a week with his Dad. The Film Club, the new memoir by the Governor-General’s Award winner is an intimate exploration of a parent’s love for a child and how a world of cinema helped a young man find himself in the real world and a father find his son. Join us for a conversation on great moments in cinema, fathers and sons, and the best bad movies ever made.

7:00 PM

  • SECRETS OF SPOKEN WORD
    WITH ONI THE HAITIAN SENSATION


    Spoken Word Poets speak their thoughts aloud and then convert them to the page, or stage, while traditional poets work on paper before reciting their poems. Join Oni the Haitian Sensation, voted “Ottawa’s favorite full-time writer/poet” in the Ottawa Xpress, an internationally recognized slam poet, author and arts educator for a session on the birthing process of Spoken Word poetry. Using her collection, Ghettostocracy, Globe and Mail Book of the Year, as inspiration, she’ll explore how a poem goes from the mouth to the page and to the stage.

 

8:30 PM

  • THE WRITING LIFE #2 :
    Readings by
    Marina Lewycka, Gil Courtemanche and Michael Winter
    Onstage conversation with Phil Jenkins


    The Writing Life continues with new work from three writers with international buzz. The U.K.’s Marina Lewycka, a Booker and Orange Prize nominee, follows up A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian with Strawberry Fields, a novel about migrant workers trapped at global capitalism’s thuggish bottom. Québec’s Gil Courtemanche, author of the international bestseller A Sunday at the Pool in Kigali, returns with A Good Death,which describes the everyday tragedy, horror, cowardice and love that lie at the heart of one family. Newfoundland’s Michael Winter gives new voice to Gabriel English, his protagonist in One Last Good Look and This All Happened with The Architects Are Here, an exploration of the nature of grief and friendship and how we go on when the future seems uncertain.

   

Thursday, October 18

Dinner today provided by Il Piccolino Restaurant (449 Preston St.) at 5:30.

10:30 AM
and
1:00 PM

 

1:00 PM

 

6:00 PM

  • SITCOM with DAVID MCGIMPSEY

    Don’t miss this performance by Festival favourite David McGimpsey. Mischievous, generous and side-splittingly funny, Sitcom, his latest collection of wry soliloquies and sonnets, begins with a milestone birthday and finds itself —  through antic turns and lyric flips to demi-mondes as varied as the offices of university regents and the basic plot arc of Hawaii Five-O to a sincere contemplation of mortality and the fashion sense of Mary Tyler Moore. 

7:00 PM

  • SIR JOHN A. MACDONALD
    Richard Gwyn in conversation with Charlotte Gray


    Award-winning biographer Charlotte Gray sits down with Richard Gwyn, one of our best-known and most highly regarded political writers, to discuss Canada’s first Prime Minister, “the irreplaceable man.” John A: The Man Who Made Us, the first volume of Richard Gwyn’s definitive biography of John A. Macdonald follows his life from his birth in Scotland in 1815 to the first Canada Day of the new Dominion in 1867. Don’t miss this colourful conversation on the man who made us.

8:00 PM

 

  • THE GEOGRAPHY OF HOPE
    With Chris Turner
    Hosted by Graham Saul with Master of Ceremonies Adrian Harewood

    THIS EVENT IS OFFSITE: Dominion-Chalmers United Church, 355 Cooper St. at O'Connor
    Presented with Imagine Ottawa


    After the fierce warnings and grim predictions of The Weather Makers and An Inconvenient Truth, The Writers Festival is pleased to be partnering with Imagine Ottawa in presenting an evening with acclaimed journalist and bestselling author Chris Turner. In his book The Geography of Hope, Turner seeks out the next generation of political, economic, social and spiritual institutions that could provide the global foundations for a sustainable future—from the green hills of northern Thailand to the parliament houses of Scandinavia, from the villages of southern India, where microcredit finance has remade the social fabric, to America’s most forward-looking think tanks. In this compelling first-person exploration, Chris Turner pieces together a dazzling map of the disparate landmarks in a geography of hope.

8:30 PM

  • POETRY CABARET
    Readings by Stephen Brockwell, Rob Winger and John Pass
    On-stage conversation with David O’Meara


    Don’t miss three of Canada’s most singular voices, sharing their work and getting to the heart of craft and creativity with poet David O’Meara. The theme of imitation—a facet of humanity that affects all actions and speech—forms the central focus of the real made up, the latest from Archibald Lampman Award winner Stephen Brockwell. Part history, part invention, Rob Winger’s Muybridge’s Horse is a long, sensual, biographical poem that follows the career of Eadweard Muybridge, the nineteenth-century photographer whose studies of bodies in motion led to the invention of moving pictures. Stumbling in the Bloom by John Pass, winner of the 2006 Governor General’s Literary Award for Poetry, engages the ever-present enticements and entanglements of beauty on life’s, and art’s, home ground—in wilderness and garden.


FRiday, October 19

Dinner today provided by Il Primo Restaurant (371 Preston St.) at 5:30.

9:00 AM

 

1:00 PM

 

6:00 PM

  • THE ANIMATION PIMP

    For five years, Chris Robinson, director of the Ottawa International Animation Festival, wrote a monthly column for Animation World Network called The Animation Pimp. His new book, The Animation Pimp, collects the best of these pieces, which range from the nuts and bolts of running a festival to sex, death, superheroes, aesthetis, and the living dead. Join us for an insider's look at the animation industry and clips from some of his favorite films.  

 

7:00 PM

  • PLANET SIMPSON
    Chris Turner in conversation with Chris Robinson


    Get in on the conversation about one of the most popular shows in television history and how it has changed the way we look at our bewildering times. Join Chris Turner, author of Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Documented an Era and Defined a Generation, for a smart, accessible and funny cultural analysis of The Simpsons, its inside stories and the world it reflects.

 

8:00 PM

 

  • LANGUAGE AND POETIC LANGUAGE
    Reading by Herménégilde Chiasson
    Onstage conversation with Wayne Grady


    Herménégilde Chiasson, the current Lieutenant-Governor of New Brunswick, is one of Canada's most accomplished cultural icons—a philosopher, filmmaker, painter, sculptor, poet, essayist, playwright, and journalist.  His latest book, released simultaneously in French and English, is Beatitudes. His deeply human “sermon on the mount” is a post-modern tour-de-force, beginning in mid-sentence and ending not with a period, but with a comma. Award-winning author and translator Wayne Grady talks with him about poetry, language and Acadia.

8:30 PM

  • CAPITAL XTRA’S TRANSGRESS
    Featuring Francisco Ibanez-Carrasco, Joey Comeau and Ivan E. Coyote
    Hosted by Ivan E. Coyote
    and Mikiki

    Take a walk on the wild side and leave your inhibitions at home! An R-rated evening of explicit prose from three of Canada’s top talents.

    A community educator and social researcher in Vancouver, Francisco Ibanez-Carrasco is the author of Killing Me Softly. Joey Comeau, author of Lockpick Pornography and Too Late To Say I’m Sorry, co-creates the photo comic A Softer World with Emily Horne. Ivan Coyote, born and raised in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, is an award-winning author and a renowned performer, whose newest collection of stories is Loose End. Her first novel, Bow Grip, just won the ReLit Award.

 


saturday, October 20

Dinner today provided by The Roses Cafe (523 Gladstone Ave.) at 5:30.

NOON

  • OUR PLACE IN THE WORLD: REDISCOVERING LANDSCAPE AND NATURE

    The Great Lakes: The Natural History of a Changing Region is an authoritative, accessible look at an ecosystem in eternal flux. Wayne Grady, one of North America’s most acclaimed science and nature writers, explores the area’s geological formation and its role in human history; its diverse plant, bird and animal species; and its significant physical, climatic and environmental features. In Phantom Limb, poet, essayist and novelist, Theresa Kishkan invites her readers to explore culture and nature by looking at landscape and place through a series of historical lenses, ranging from natural history to family history to the broader notions of regional and human history. Join these celebrated writers for a discussion on the challenges of preserving and connecting with the natural world.

 

2:00 PM

  • LIVING VOICES OF THE PAST
    Phil Jenkins and Roy MacSkimming

    Two of the region’s most respected authors have just released historical books in the first person. Beneath My Feet, by Phil Jenkins is a non-fiction memoir of George Mercer Dawson, Using Dawson’s own words, and filling in the gaps in Dawson’s voice, it presents a portrait of a towering figure in Canadian history, the man who led the Geological Survey during its exploration of the Canadian West. Macdonald: A Novel, by Roy Macskimming, recreates the last days of our first Prime Minister’s life as Narrated by his private secretary, Joseph Pope. Engaging with the past in a discussion on Canada’s vibrant history and neglected heroes.

 

4:00 PM

  • NEW SCIENCE SERIES:
    A NEUROSCIENTIST'S CASE FOR THE EXISTENCE OF THE SOUL
    Mario Beauregard in conversation with Neil Wilson

    Do religious experiences come from God, or are they merely the random firing of neurons in the brain? By exploring the latest neurological research on phenomena such as intuition, willpower, and leaps of faith, of the ‘placebo effect’ in medicine, of near-death experiences on the operating table, and of psychic premonitions of a loved one in crisis—to say nothing of the occasional sense of oneness with nature and mystical experiences in meditation or prayer—Mario Beauregard’s The Spiritual Brain seeks their real source. Join the discussion with the author, a neuroscientist who instead of explaining away religious experience, shows that genuine, life-changing spiritual events can be scientifically documented.

 

6:00 PM
  • CRIMINAL MINDS: MYSTERY NIGHT AT THE FESTIVAL
    Reading by Linda Moore and Peter Robinson
    On-stage conversation with David Dollin

    We celebrate crime writing with an acclaimed debut and the return of an undisputed master. Linda Moore’s first book Foul Deeds: A Rosalind Mystery, follows a professional criminologist and a cranky private investigator to an adhoc theatre company’s production of Hamlet, where murder is not just a spectacle seen on stage. Once a place for a passionate escape, the theatre is now the location for danger, kidnapping, a City Hall cover-up, a late-night chase, and sordid family secrets. Peter Robinson’s Inspector Banks novels are among the best detective fiction in the world, and their multi-layered stories continue to surprise, engross, thrill and delight readers. Friend of the Devil is a superb showcase of how deftly he balances horror with humour, police procedures with the nuances of all-too-human emotions, and endings with the promise of new beginnings.



8:00 PM
  • WRITING LIFE #3
    Reading by Helen Oyeyemi, Gil Adamson and Frances Itani
    On-stage conversation with Sarah Dearing

    The Writing Life series concludes with three celebrated authors whose characters come vividly to life on the page. Helen Oyeyemi’s acclaimed second novel, The Opposite House, explores the search for home through two parallel voices, one a Cuban émigrée who speaks the Spanish of her native land and the English of her adopted country but longs for a connection to her African roots, the other, a Yoruban goddess. Renowned poet, Gil Adamson’s widely praised debut novel, The Outlander, opens in 1903 with a mysterious, desperate young woman, a widow by her own hand and one quick step ahead of the law, fleeing alone across the West, and tells the tale of her deliberate journey into the wild. Remembering the Bones by Frances Itani, winner of the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, is the story of Georgina Danforth Witley, an 80-year old who drives her car off the road. Injured, alone and unable to move, it is the story of an ordinary person who, in her instinct to survive, becomes extraordinary.


sunday, October 21

Dinner today provided by Canvas Restaurant (65 Holland Ave.) at 5:30.

NOON

  • BIG IDEA: UNDERSTANDING THE AMERICAN EMPIRE
    James Laxer in conversation with Christina Leadlay

    The United States presides over the most far-flung imperial system ever established. Documenting how the American Empire works and what it means to the rest of the world, James Laxer asks: Does the American Empire bring stability to a troubled world or, like its imperial predecessors, does it impose inequality and oppression on humanity? And what happens when an empire tumbles? His new book, Empire, compares the American Empire to those of the past, finding much that can be learned from the fates of the British, Roman, Chinese, Incan and Aztec empires. Join the bestselling author of Stalking the Elephant and The Border for an informative conversation on what the past can teach us about the years ahead.

 

2:00 PM

  • THE LIFE AND POETRY OF JOHN NEWLOVE
    Documentary Film and Book Launch
    with Robert McTavish
    Hosted by rob mclennan

    Honour the memory of one of Canada’s greatest poets with this screening of What to make of it all? The life and poetry of John Newlove and the launch of A Long Continual Argument: The Selected Poems of John Newlove. The film’s poignant interviews with Newlove in his last years are punctuated with commentary from George Bowering, Patrick Lane, Joe Rosenblatt, John Metcalf and the many poets and friends who knew the public persona and the private man. B.C.’s Robert McTavish, who directed and produced the film and edited the book shares his passion for Newlove’s plain-spoken and carefully crafted work, which mixed an obsession with the history and identity of the Prairies with a bleak personal struggle for understanding.

 

2:00 PM

 

  • THE BIG IDEA: CHILD SOLDIERS AND SEX SLAVES:
    The Kidnapped Girls of Uganda
    Kathy Cook in conversation with Kate Heartfield

    Using searing first-hand accounts, award-winning journalist Kathy Cook uncovers the horrific life of child sex slaves and soldiers in Uganda’s Lord’s Resistance Army. Her new book, Stolen Angels, tells the story of 30 Ugandan schoolgirls who were abducted in October 1996 by Joseph Kony, the LRA leader who has been indicted for war crimes by the international criminal court. Join the discussion on these pawns in a forgotten African war and the heroic group of mothers and interfaith clerics who waged a crusade to rescue them.

6:00 PM

  • REAL FICTION: WHERE CHARACTERS LIVE WHEN YOU'RE NOT READING
    Jasper Fforde in conversation with Sean Wilson

    Even if you have never racked your brains over the thermodynamic impossibilties of simultaneous porridge pouring, you won’t want to miss this evening in the Well of Lost Plots with Jasper Fforde, one of the most wildly original writers in the English language. His internationally bestselling Thursday Next and Nursery Crime books inhabit a world where time and reality are endlessly mutable, and have been praised as “catnip to book lovers” by the New York Times. Join the conversation about where characters really come from and where they go for vacations, whether or not Shakespeare’s works are a gift from the future, how time travel actually works, where Godot has been and the growing influence of the Toast Marketing Board.

 

8:00 PM
  • 2007 RELIT AWARDS: IDEAS NOT MONEY
    Readings by Bill Gaston, Daniel Scott Tysdal and Ivan E. Coyote
    Hosted by Kenneth J. Harvey

    “The country’s pre-eminent literary prize
    recognizing independent presses.”
    The Globe and Mail

    Internationally acclaimed novelist and founder of the ReLit Awards, Kenneth J. Harvey hosts the awards ceremony and readings by this year’s winners.

    SHORT FICTION: Gargoyles by Bill Gaston
    “A volcanic 12-pack of stories... Gaston is one of this country’s outstanding literary treasures.”
    The Globe and Mail

    POETRY: Predicting the Next Big Advertising Breakthrough Using a Potentially Dangerous Method by Daniel Scott Tysdal
    “Daniel Scott Tysdal’s poetry is an exhilarating mix of pop culture, philosophy, mythology and visual art... Read this book for its confident virtuosity, its innovative spirit, and its surprising generosity.”
    — Jon Paul Fiorentino

    NOVEL: Bow Grip by Ivan E. Coyote
    An unexpectedly moral tale with an undercurrent of humour and irony that is irresistible.... Coyote may have revived something literature has desperately needed for a while: the truly decent hero.

    The Globe and Mail

 

 

 

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