Fall Edition 2008 - October 18-27
At Library and Archives Canada, 395 Wellington Street


Saturday, october 18

NOON to
6:00 PM

  • SMALL PRESS BOOK FAIR
    Presented in partnership with the Small Press Action Network-Ottawa and Ottawa Independent Writers


    Join us during the inaugural Writers Festival Book Fair, celebrating Ottawa’s diversity and supporting small presses and self-published authors from throughout the region. With more than 30 exhibitors, the book fair is an ideal place to discover your next favourite.

    A free event.


6:00 PM

  • MEET THE MOVERS AND SHAKERS IN OTTAWA'S LITERARY SCENE

    There’s never been a better time to be a book lover or writer in the Nation’s Capital. Get to know the people and oganizations whose hard work and dedication is responsible for this city’s thriving literary scene. From publishers, to presenters, to publicists we’ve invited the players to introduce themselves, tell us what they do, and let us know how we can all get involved!

    A free event.

8:00 PM

  • CITY OF OTTAWA BOOK AWARDS/LE PRIX DU LIVRE D'OTTAWA AND THE LAMPMAN-SCOTT AWARD FOR POETRY

    The City of Ottawa and ARC Poetry Society are pleased to invite you to attend a celebration of Ottawa’s vibrant literary scene at this opening night event for the Ottawa International Writers Festival.

    Award presentations will be made to the winners of the Ottawa Book Awards and the Lampman-Scott Prize for best book of poetry, with short readings by the winning authors. Join us for a reception following the award presentations and meet the outstanding authors who have been nominated for these prestigious prizes.

    The Finalists are:

  • English Fiction
    Mary Borsky, Cobalt Blue (Thomas Allen Publishers)
    Elizabeth Hay, Late Nights on Air (McClelland and Stewart)
    Frances Itani, Remembering the Bones (HarperCollins)
    Joanne Proulx, Anthem of a Reluctant Prophet (Penguin Canada)
    Rob Winger, Muybridge’s Horse (Nightwood Editions)

  • English Non Fiction
    Kathy Cook, Stolen Angels (Penguin Canada)
    Tim Cook, At the Sharp End: Canadians Fighting the Great War 1914-1916 (Penguin Canada)
    David Goldfield, The Ambassador’s Word: Hostage Crisis in Peru 1996-1997 (Penumbra Press)
    Chris Jones, Out of Orbit (House of Anansi Press)
    Arthur Kroeger, Hard Passage: A Mennonite Family’s Long Journey from Russia to Canada (University of Alberta Press)

  • Création littéraire en français
    Angèle Bassolé-Ouédraogo, Les Porteuses d’Afrique! (Les Éditions L’Interligne)
    Andrée Christensen, Depuis toujours j’entendais la mer (Les Éditions David)
    Jean Mohsen Fahmy, Alexandre et les trafiquants du désert (Les Éditions L’Interligne)
    Maurice Henrie, Le Chuchotement des étoiles (Prise de parole)
    Gilles Lacombe, La Jouissance des nuages de la pensée (Les Éditions L’Interligne)

  • Finalists for the Lampman-Scott Award for Poetry
    Michael Blouin for I’m not going to lie to you
    Stephen Brockwell for The Real Made Up
    Anne Le Dressay for Old Winter
    Nicholas Lea for Everything is Movies
    Luis Lama for Alien Land
    Nadine McInnis for Two Hemispheres
    rob mclennan for The Ottawa City Project
    Colin Morton for The Cabbage of Paradise
    Shane Rhodes for The Bindery
    Ian Roy for Red Bird
    Asoka Weerasinghe for Mayan Love Songs

    A free event.


sunday, october 19

NOON

 

 

  • THE BIG IDEA: IS CANADA THE COUNTRY WE
    THINK IT IS?
    With John Ralston Saul
    Hosted by The Hill Times's Jim Creskey


    Are you ready for three radical truths about Canada? In his latest book, A Fair Country: Telling Truths about Canada, John Ralston Saul, Canada’s leading public intellectual, unveils what he calls three founding myths: 1) We are a Métis Civilization; 2) “Peace, Order and Good Government” has always been an interloper in Canada; 3) We are burdened with an elite that doesn’t identify with Canada and so does not wish to govern the country. Join us for a conversation on recognizing Canada as it is in order to rethink its future.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40


2:00 PM

 

 

  • THE BIG IDEA: MULTICULTURALISM AND RELIGIOUS ACCOMMODATION
    With Tarek Fatah and Michael Adams
    Hosted by Neil Wilson


    Join the conversation on plurality, multiculturalism and how Canada should ensure freedom for all while respecting our shared ideals and identity. Tarek Fatah, founder of the Muslim Canadian Congress and author of Chasing a Mirage: The Tragic Illusion of an Islamic State is a controversial advocate for the separation of religion and state. Noted commentator, founding president of the Environics group and bestselling author of Unlikely Utopia: The Surprising Triumph of Canadian Pluralism, Michael Adams disputes the warnings of many that Canada is becoming increasingly fragmented along ethnocultural lines and argues that immigration and multiculturalism are working remarkably well in Canada.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40

2:00 PM

 

  • MASTERCLASS SERIES: WRITING FOR CHILDREN, WRITING FOR ADULTS
    With Edeet Ravel, Dave Bidini and Paul Glennon


    Join three acclaimed authors who write for both adults and children, for an informative conversation on the craft. Canadian-Israeli author Edeet Ravel, winner of the Hugh MacLennan Prize, recently published The Saver for teen readers and Your Sad Eyes and Unforgettable Mouth. The latest from musician and writer Dave Bidini, Around the World in 57 ½ Gigs, chronicles his post-Rheostatics global journey, while For Those About to Write offers insights to young writers and writers-to-be. Bookweird is the first book for kids from Paul Glennon, whose previous novel The Dodecahedron was a Governor General’s nominee.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40


4:00 PM

 

 

  • THE BIG IDEA: CANADIANS IN THE SHADOW OF WAR
    With Major General (Ret'd) Lewis MacKenzie
    Hosted by Embassy's Lee Berthiaume


    In his memoir Soldiers Made Me Look Good, Lewis MacKenzie, the most experienced peacekeeper in the world, traces his post-military career as an international commentator on military affairs, a consultant to the Irish government and a federal political candidate. Join us for a wide ranging discussion on Canada’s place on the world stage that covers everything from his professional disagreement with the leadership priorities demonstrated by Roméo Dallaire in the early hours of the Rwandan genocide, to “the first real litmus test for NATO —Afghanistan.”

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40

5:30 PM

 

 

  • DINNER IN THE FOYER
    Provided by Pilos Restaurant
    (876 Montreal Road: (613) 741-4657)


    Join us for chicken souvlaki, vegetarian moussaka, salad and bread, and tzatziki.

6:00 PM

 

  • CRIMINAL MINDS:
    Andrew Pyper, Maureen Jennings and Peter Robinson
    Hosted by Wayne Grady


    Acclaimed writer and Festival Board Member Wayne Grady curates and hosts an evening of exceptional mystery and thriller writing. Andrew Pyper, winner of the Arthur Ellis Award, returns to the Festival with his fourth novel The Killing Circle. Maureen Jennings, author of the beloved Murdoch Mysteries, set in Victorian Toronto, returns with The K Handshape, the second in her Christine Morris series. International bestseller and Arthur Ellis Award winner Peter Robinson returns to Inspector Banks and the Festival with All the Colours of Darkness.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40


8:00 PM

  • THE WRITING LIFE #1: EVERY HAPPY FAMILY
    Joan Barfoot, Tristan Hughes and Donna Morrissey
    Hosted by Carleton University's Sara Jamieson


    "Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." — Leo Tolstoy

    Joan Barfoot, winner of the Marian Engel Award, returns with Exit Lines, described by the Montreal Gazette as “a tautly paced ensemble piece shot through with pathos, poignancy and insights about aging.” Canadian-born Welsh writer Tristan Hughes, winner of the Rhys Davies Short Story Award, returns with Revenant, praised by Madeleine Thien as “a beautiful novel, rich in the complexities of childhood.” Donna Morrissey, winner of the CBA Libris Award, returns with What They Wanted, exploring the wild shores of a Newfoundland outport and the equally wild environment of an Alberta oil rig.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40


monday, october 20

Step Into Stories

NOON

  • MASTERCLASS SERIES: EXPLORING VOICE AND SETTING
    With Edeet Ravel and Andrew Steinmetz
    Hosted by Carleton University's Armand Garnet Ruffo


    Edeet Ravel, author of the Tel Aviv Trilogy, described in the Globe and Mail as “unflinching in her exploration of the moral and emotional conflicts of her characters and of the country in which they live,” and Andrew Steinmetz, author of Eva’s Threepenny Theatre, an unusual blend of fiction and memoir that tells the story of his great-aunt Eva (who performed in the first workshop production of Bertolt Brecht’s masterpiece) share tips and tricks for developing voice and exploring setting.

    $10 General / $5 Senior / Free for student groups
    Day Pass: $30


5:30 PM

 

 

  • DINNER IN THE FOYER
    Provided by La Roma Restaurant
    (430 Preston Street - (613) 234-8244
    )

    Join us for penne primavera or tortellini bolognese with Caesar salad and garlic bread.


6:00 PM

 

  • DEAD ALIVE
    With Murray Wilson


    The theme of this year’s Dead Alive is the poetry of the Chinese ideograph. The route taken to the Orient in this presentation, however, will take us from Anglo-Saxon, to Chaucer, all the way over to Babylonia for a look at an early pictogram, a few cuneiform, and some delights in Chinese-English translations. Once we have relaxed a little, we will entertain some of the rigours and poetry of Chinese calligraphy. Many highly educated Chinese remain unaware of the poetic role played by the various parts of the Chinese ideograph that work together to create significance, just as we in the West seem less concerned with a word’s etymology than its blunt meaning. This presentation will explore a number of interpretative possibilities with special emphasis on one particular ideograph, XIN, the heart.

    $10 General / $5 Senior / Free for student groups
    Day Pass: $30

7:00 PM

 

  • THE BIG IDEA: THE ECONOMY AND ECOLOGY OF OIL
    With Andrew Nikiforuk and James Laxer
    Hosted by David H. Martin: Climate & Energy Coordinator, Greenpeace Canada

    With cheap, accessible oil supplies dwindling, and growing evidence of the true cost of fossil fuels to the world’s environment, join us for a conversation on our relationship with oil and possible solutions for a green future. In Tar Sands: Dirty Oil and the Future of a Continent, Andrew Nikiforuk, winner of seven National Magazine Awards, explores the frenzied development of the tar sands, which has made Canada the world’s fifth greatest global exporter of oil. In Oil, political scientist James Laxer tells the story of the ascent of the giant petroleum companies and examines the relationship between oil and geo-politics.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30


7:00 PM

 

  • LIVING HISTORY: EXPLORING THE PAST
    With Sandra Gulland and David Rotenberg
    Hosted by Merilyn Simonds

    Bestselling author and editor Merilyn Simonds hosts an evening of historical fiction with two of Canada’s most acclaimed writers. Sandra Gulland, author of the international bestselling Josephine B Trilogy, blends fact and fiction to imagine the life of Louise de la Vallière, mistress to Louis XIV, in Mistress of the Sun. In Shanghai, director and author David Rotenberg tells the multi-generational story of the centrepiece of the new China, beginning with China’s First Emperor, Q’in She Huang, and continuing through the centuries.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30

8:30 PM

 

  • WRITING LIFE #2: THAT WE MAY FEAR LESS
    Andrew Steinmetz, Maggie Helwig and Nino Ricci
    Hosted by Brenda Carr Vellino


    “Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.” —Marie Curie

    Ottawa’s Andrew Steinmetz, makes his Festival debut with Eva’s Threepenny Theatre, a blend of fiction and memoir about his great-aunt who performed in the first workshop of Brecht’s masterpiece. Maggie Helwig returns with her bold novel, Girls Fall Down, showing how easy and gentle is the slide into paranoia, and how enormous and terrifying is the slide into love. Governor General’s Award winner Nino Ricci returns with The Origin of Species, about an unexceptional man haunted by an extraordinary experience in the Galapagos Islands that threatens to upend the balance of his ordinary life.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30


tuesday, october 21

Step Into Stories

9:30 AM

  • STEP INTO STORIES
    Kate MacDonald Butler on Anne of Green Gables
    This event is at Library and Archives Canada


    Join Lucy Maud Montgomery’s granddaughter for an insider's perspective on Anne of Green Gables and her enduring legacy. This event is presented in partnership with Library and Archives Canada’s Reflecting on Anne exhibit.

    A free event.

    (free Anne of Green Gables workshop to follow; reading is open: registration for workshop is limited. Call 613-562-1243 to reserve space.)

NOON

  • THE BIG IDEA: THE BETRAYAL OF AFRICA
    With Gerald Caplan and Joan Baxter
    Hosted by Blair Rutherford and Pius Adesanmi


    Join the conversation as we explore Africa’s history and contemporary struggles and successes. Gerald Caplan is a lifelong social and political activist with a passionate commitment to African development, whose book The Betrayal of Africa was described by Barbara Coloroso as “a must read for students, scholars, educators and anyone else who cares about the human family, our interconnectedness and our interdependence.” Joan Baxter is a Canadian anthropologist, journalist and award-winning author whose life and work in Africa for the past 21 years informs her latest, Dust from Our Eyes: An Unblinkered Look at Africa. Part memoir, part adventure tale, part political thriller, her work dissolves stereotypes and exposes paradoxes about Africa.

    $10 General / $5 Senior / Free for student groups
    Day Pass: $30


5:30 PM

 

 

  • DINNER IN THE FOYER
    Provided by Habesha
    (1087 Wellington Street West - (613) 761-6120
    )

6:00 PM

  • FESTIVAL OPEN MIKE
    Hosted by Kate Hunt


    Our first ever open mic set at the Writers Festival will feature nine five-minute readings — open to any kind of writing. Participants will be chosen by draw at the event. Don’t miss the opportunity to catch some great talent or to share your work!

    A free event.

7:00 PM

  • BYWORDS JOHN NEWLOVE POETRY AWARDS
    Hosted by Amanda Earl


    This year’s winning poem “is witty and thoughtful, mysterious and competent. It does not sacrifice prosody and notation to affect. It shows confidence and practised skill on the part of its author.”
    — George Bowering

    Join us for the announcement of the winner; readings by the 2008 recipient of the award, honourable mentions and launch of the chapbook Lupercalia by Sean Moreland, last year’s winner. Also featuring the music of Marie-Josée Houle.

    A free event.


7:00 PM

  • THE BIG IDEA: WHAT WILL OUR TROOPS HAVE ACCOMPLISHED IN AFGHANISTAN?
    With Chris Wattie and James Laxer
    Hosted by Embassy's Jeff Davis


    After seven years and the deaths of 97 Canadian soldiers, an exit date has been set for 2011. We turn to two Canadians with radically different takes on our role in the war to ask: is Canada making the world safer, or is our involvement is only making matters worse? In Contact Charlie: The Canadian Army, The Taliban and the Battle that Saved Afghanistan, National Post reporter and embedded journalist Chris Wattie offers an intimate and harrowing look at a series of battles that would eventually take the lives of seven soldiers. Mission of Folly: Canada and Afghanistan is James Laxer’s candid report on our involvement in the war, detailing the motives underlying the invasion and occupation and challenging the justification for our involvement.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30

8:30 PM

  • TREE READING SERIES PRESENTS: THE USE OF HUMOR IN POETRY AND FICTION
    With Anne Compton, Mike Blouin and Rhonda Douglas
    Hosted by Don Officer

    The Tree Reading Series presents Anne Compton, winner of the Governor General’s Award for Poetry, for her collection Processional and the 2008 recipient of the Alden Nowlan Award; Mike Blouin, author of I’m not going to lie to you and Chase and Haven and a recipient of Arc Magazine’s Diana Brebner Prize as well as the Lillian I. Found prize for Poetry from Carleton University; and Rhonda Douglas, author of Some Days I Think I Know Things: The Cassandra Poems and former recipient of the Malahat Review’s Far Horizons Award for Poetry and Arc Magazine’s Diana Brebner Award.

    A free event.

8:30 PM

 

 

  • THE BIG IDEA: ALL THE NEWS THAT'S FIT TO PRINT: HEADLINE NEWS AND THE STORIES THAT ARE
    NEVER TOLD
    With Patrick Brown and Joan Baxter
    Hosted by The Sun's Christina Spencer


    “If it bleeds, it leads.” The media is preoccupied with war, scandal and disaster. Where are the good news stories — especially on international affairs? Author and Ottawa Citizen columnist Dan Gardner hosts the conversation with Patrick Brown, who has reported from around the world and is now CBC’s correspondent in Beijing, and Joan Baxter, who has lived and worked in Africa for 21 years and reported for the BBC World Service, Associated Press, and Reuters.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30


wednesday, october 22

Step Into Stories

9:00 AM

  • STEP INTO STORIES: Kenneth Oppel
    At Rockcliffe Park Public School


NOON

  • BUTTERFLY MIND: ONE ON ONE WITH PATRICK BROWN
    Hosted by Neil Wilson


    In Butterfly Mind, award-winning journalist Patrick Brown weaves together three stories: the first is Brown’s own education as a journalist over the past twenty-five years, and his parallel struggle with alcoholism. The second tells about the major political events of the past quarter century that Brown witnessed and covered. The third story is about China, which Brown first visited in 1989 during the Tiananmen Square protests and now calls home. The book ends, fittingly, in Beijing on the eve of the 2008 Olympics.

    $10 General / $5 Senior / Free for student groups
    Day Pass: $30


12:10 PM

5:30 PM

  • INTERNATIONAL SPOTLIGHT ON
    ZBIGNIEW HERBERT (1924 - 1998)
    Presented with the Embassy of Poland
    Wine and Cheese reception


    On the occasion of Poland declaring 2008 as the year of Zbigniew Herbert, we present a celebration of the influential poet, essayist, playwright and moralist. Our tribute to Zbigniew Herbert includes a reception and talk on his life and work by Professor Emeritus Bogdana Carpenter of the University of Michigan, and dramatic readings of his poetry in English and Polish by Maria Nowotarska and Agata Pilitowska from the Polish Theatre of Toronto. A free event.

    A free event.

7:00 PM

  • BOOK SHORTS: MOVING STORIES FILMS
    Produced by BookShorts Literacy Program
    with Paul Quarrington, Judith Keenan and Directors Rachel Peters and Gary Thomas

    MOVING STORIES FILMS: Celebrating the written word on screen. Imagine Ernest Hemingway on a speed date with Deepa Mehta. Or Woody Allen optioning Ulysses. How about John Grierson adapting Green Eggs and Ham? Moving Stories Films is a hilarious, odd and poignant program of short films from all over the world. Some are faithful to the page and others respond with fanciful glee, leaping off into an inspired universe of invention. This premiere program is curated by Paul Quarrington and Judith Keenan, with the expert opinion of their illustrious advisors: Robert Lantos, Sarah Polley, Nino Ricci, Gary Thomas and Anne Collins.

    Note: Rated 18A: suitable for viewing by persons 18 years of age or older; persons under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. May contain explicit violence, frequent coarse language, sexual activity and/or horror.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30


7:00 PM

 

  • LIVING HISTORY: OUR POETIC PAST
    Douglas Burnet Smith on Marie Curie and Troy Jollimore on Tom Thomson
    Hosted by Rob Winger


    Governor General’s Award finalist Rob Winger, whose debut Muybridge's Horse was a biographical long poem on Eadweard Muybridge, hosts two acclaimed poets whose work mines the territories where history, biography and poetry overlap. In his 12th collection, Sister Prometheus: Discovering Marie Curie, Douglas Burnet Smith imagines the inner life of a scientific genius, mother, wife and lover in both verse and prose poems. Troy Jollimore’s first book of poetry, Tom Thomson in Purgatory, selected by former US Poet Laureate Billy Collins for the Robert E. Lee & Ruth I. Wilson Poetry Book Award, won the 2006 National Book Critics Circle Award. Reading by both poets will be followed by an on-stage conversation.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30


8:30 PM

 

  • THE WRITING LIFE #3: A PROFOUND TRUTH
    Pasha Malla, Rebecca Rosenblum and Ivan E. Coyote
    Hosted by Neil Wilson


    “The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement. But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.”
    —Niels Bohr

    In our first ever Writing Life devoted exclusively to short stories, we offer the stage to two acclaimed debuts and a Festival favourite. Pasha Malla’s The Withdrawal Method is described in the Globe and Mail as “devoted to the timeless narrative rewards of the fickle human heart.” Of Rebecca Rosenblum, winner of the 2007 Metcalf-Rooke Award for Once, Caroline Adderson says, “a single one of these stories offers more truth and humanity than the entire contents of most bookshelves.” With The Slow Fix, Ivan E. Coyote, winner of the 2007 ReLit Award returns to her short story roots. Find out why the Ottawa XPress says, “Coyote is to CanLit what k.d. lang is to country music: a beautifully odd fixture.”

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30


thursday, october 23

Step Into Stories

10:00 AM

  • STEP INTO STORIES: Kenneth Oppel
    At Library and Archives Canada (Auditorium)

    - SOLD OUT! -

    Kenneth Oppel
    is back!

    Don’t miss this opportunity to meet Kenneth Oppel, hear about the writing of his latest bestseller, Starclimber, and get the answers to your questions.

    Free for school groups.

NOON

  • MASTERCLASS SERIES: ESSENTIALS OF DIALOGUE
    With Pasha Malla and Brian Doyle


    Don’t miss this session on writing dialogue, featuring one of Canada’s most acclaimed new voices, Pasha Malla, hailed in the Vancouver Sun as “splendidly creative. . . . an absolute gem” and one of our undisputed greats, Brian Doyle, winner of the Mr. Christie’s Book Award and the Vicky Metcalf Award for a Body of Work.

    $10 General / $5 Senior / Free for student groups
    Day Pass: $30


4:00 PM

 

 

 

  • MASTERCLASS SERIES: FROM PAGE TO SCREEN
    With Judith Keenan and Paul Quarrington
    Hosted by Tom Shoebridge
    Presented with the Summer Institute of Film and Television


    Join our host, Tom Shoebridge, founder of the Summer Institute for Film and Television and the Canadian Screen Training Centre, for a conversation on writing and filming a script. Judith Keenan, Executive Director and Founder of BookShorts Inc., has produced more than 100 news features, 16 short films and a national television series. Paul Quarrington is a filmmaker, author and musician. His screenplays include Camilla, Giant Steps, Perfectly Normal and Whale Music, adapted from his novel.

    $10 General / $5 Senior / Free for student groups
    Day Pass: $30

5:30 PM

 

 

  • DINNER IN THE FOYER
    Provided by La Dolce Vita
    (180 Preston Street - (613) 233-9808
    )

    Join us for appetizer size pizzas (5 cheese or combination),
    rigatoni with chicken, sundried tomoatos, Brie cheese and spinach in a creamy white sauce, and aioli vegetable penne (gluten free) accompanied by garden salad & bread.

6:00 PM

 

 

  • MASTERCLASS SERIES: ANIMATING BOOKS
    With Rachel Peters and Gary Thomas
    Hosted by Chris Robinson
    Presented with the Ottawa Animation Festival

    Join host Chris Robinson, author and Artistic Director of the Ottawa International Animation Festival, for a conversation on adapting books and stories for animation. Rachel Peters, writer, animator, editor and director, was mentored by legendary animators like NFB’s Kaj Pindal and John Weldon, and strives to constantly push animation to new levels. Gary Thomas began his career in animation and computer graphics, working in television commercials. He has directed Cannes and Clio award winning commercials and was a Grammy finalist for his work on Moby’s Play DVD.

    $10 General / $5 Senior / Free for student groups
    Day Pass: $30


7:00 PM

 

  • A MEETING OF VOICES – UN RENDEZ-VOUS DE VOIX
    With - Avec Seymour Mayne, Marc Charron and/et Christiane Melançon

    French and English Canada each have rich poetic traditions. Despite the edict of national bilingualism, each tradition persists largely in isolation from the other. Pluriel, the first bilingual anthology of Canadian poetry, hopes to weaken this isolation. For the first time, English and French Canadian poetry is gathered in the same volume and presented with a translation into the other official language. Join editors Seymour Mayne, Marc Charron and Christiane Melançon at this bilingual event to celebrate the release of Pluriel and to hear poetry read by the poets and translators.

    Au Canada, cohabitent de riches traditions poétiques française et anglaise. En dépit du bilinguisme national officiel, les deux traditions restent toutefois isolées l’une de l’autre. Pluriel, première anthologie bilingue de poésie canadienne, vise à rompre cet isolement. Pour la première fois, un même volume réunit en version originale ainsi qu’en traduction une sélection de poèmes canadiens en français et en anglais. Venez célébrer le lancement de Pluriel en compagnie les directeurs de l’ouvrage Seymour Mayne, Marc Charron, et Christiane Melançon et prêter l’oreille à la magnifique poésie lue par les poètes et les traducteurs.

    A free event.

7:00 PM

  • MORE: ONE ON ONE WITH AUSTIN CLARKE
    Hosted by Carleton University's Sarah Casteel

    Austin Clarke
    , winner of the Giller Prize, the Commonwealth Prize, and the Trillium Prize, returns to the Festival with his acclaimed new novel, More. Perhaps the most political of all of Austin Clarke’s novels, it is a powerful indictment of the iniquities of racial discrimination and the crime of poverty. Some have described it as a companion volume to The Polished Hoe. Join us for insights into this extraordinary novel about oppression and redemption and hope—an allegory about the complexities of race in modern western culture.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30


8:30 PM

 

 

  • WRITING THAT ROCKS:
    Paul Quarrington and the Porkbelly Futures
    with special guests Lori Yates and Bob Wiseman
    Presented with Cisco Ottawa Bluesfest


    Building on the fun from Bluesfest, this concert features some of Canada’s most acclaimed songwriting and finest musicians. The Ottawa Citizen calls Lori Yates “a stellar country performer with an ache in her voice that leaves strong men weak-kneed (and) self-possessed women misty-eyed.” Ron Sexsmith calls Bob Wiseman “Canada’s Tom Waits.” Porkbelly Futures takes writers, rockers and classical musicians and does the only logical thing: it creates a sort of alt. country blues band. The Montreal Gazette says: “These are literary blues tunes for people who have read Hemingway and Atwood.”

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30

8:30 PM

 

 

  • ARC POETRY 30th ANNIVERSARY LAUNCH AND CELEBRATION
    Featuring Steven Heighton, Roo Borson, Sonnet L'Abbé and Mary Dalton
    Hosted by CBC Radio's Adrian Harewood


    Arc Poetry Magazine celebrates 30 years of publishing the best Canadian contemporary poetry with the launch of the Thirtieth Anniversary Issue, 1978-2008. This celebration, hosted by CBC’s Adrian Harewood, includes readings from Lampert Award winner Steven Heighton, Governor General’s finalist Roo Borson, Bronwen Wallace Memorial Award winner Sonnet L’Abbé and E.J. Pratt Poetry Award winner Mary Dalton.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30


friday, october 24

Step Into Stories

NOON

 

  • MASTERCLASS SERIES: STYLE AND SUBSTANCE
    Exploring the relationship between emotion and form
    in poetry
    With Steven Heighton and Sonnet L'Abbé
    Hosted by Michelle Desbarats

    An in-depth conversation on writing poetry with two talented wordsmiths. Join Steven Heighton, the author of nine books, including his poetry collections The Ecstasy of Skeptics and The Address Book, and Sonnet L’Abbé, the author of two collections of poetry, A Strange Relief and Killarnoe, for an insiders look at the relationship between a poem’s form and structure and its emotion and intent.

    $10 General / $5 Senior / Free for student groups
    Day Pass: $30

4:00 PM

  • MASTERCLASS SERIES: FROM PAGE TO STAGE
    With Daniel MacIvor
    Hosted by Lorne Pardy


    Playwright, actor, director, filmmaker and winner of the Governor General’s Literary Award for Drama, Daniel MacIvor discusses writing for the stage with Lorne Pardy, former Artistic Director of the Great Canadian Theatre Company and an accomplished actor, director and teacher. Daniel’s award-winning productions include Wild Abandon, This Is A Play and You Are Here. This year, he was the inaugural Senior Playwright In Residence at the Playwrights Colony at the Banff Centre.

    $10 General / $5 Senior / Free for student groups
    Day Pass: $30


5:30 PM

 

 

  • DINNER IN THE FOYER
    Provided by Perfection-Satisfaction-Promise
    (167 Laurier Ave. East - (613) 234- 7299
    )

    Join us for vegetarian chili, dhal or chickpea curry, with brown rice, green salad and bread.

6:00 PM

 

  • NEW SCIENCE SERIES: DAN FALK ON
    UNDERSTANDING TIME

    Hosted by Carleton University's Peter Watson

    Time is at once intimately familiar and yet deeply mysterious. It is thoroughly intangible: We say it flows like a river — yet when we try to examine that flow, the river seems reduced to a mirage. No wonder philosophers, poets and scientists have grappled with the idea of time for centuries. The enigma of time has also captivated science journalist Dan Falk, winner of the Science in Society Journalism Award and the American Institute of Physics’ Science Writing Award, who sets off on an intellectual journey In Search of Time. Join us for an exploration of our deep desire to track time’s cycles, the mysteries of memory, the beginning and the end of time, and our latest theories about time travel — and the paradoxes it seems to entail.

    $10 General / $5 Senior / Free for student groups
    Day Pass: $30

7:00 PM

 

  • NEW SCIENCE SERIES: THE BLACK HOLE WAR:
    Leonard Susskinda on Quantum Mechanics and
    Black Holes
    Hosted by Stephen Brockwell


    What happens when something is sucked into a black hole? Does it disappear? Three decades ago, a young physicist named Stephen Hawking claimed it did. In his new book, The Black Hole War, Leonard Susskind, the Felix Bloch Professor in theoretical physics at Stanford University, sets out to explain modern physics, quantum mechanics, the fate of stars and the deep mysteries of black holes. Join us for an inside account of the battle among Stephen Hawking, Leonard Susskind and Gerard 't Hooft over the true nature of black holes—with nothing less than our understanding of the entire universe at stake.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30


8:30 PM

 

  • THE BIG IDEA: CREATING LIVABLE CITIES
    With John Lorinc and Mark Kingwell
    Hosted by CBC Radio's Adrian Harewood

    What makes a city truly livable? Join us for a wide-ranging conversation on urban issues and the fundamental importance of cities in the 21st Century. In Cities, award-winning urban affairs writer John Lorinc offers a compelling vision of how to make Canada’s metropolitan centres sustainable, livable, and competitive. In Concrete Reveries, philosopher, professor and cultural critic Mark Kingwell offers a thoughtful answer to Socrates’ injunction about the life worth living, using the urban experience to illustrate the dynamic between concreteness and abstraction that operates within us. In Opening Gambits, Mark probes the role of art and philosophy in modern society.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30

8:30 PM

 

  • CAPITAL XTRA PRESENTS: TRANSGRESS
    featuring Sean Horlor, Todd Klinck, Nairne Holtz and Daniel MacIvor
    Hosted by DeAnne Smith and Mikiki


    Take a walk on the wild side and leave your inhibitions at home! Join co-hosts DeAnne Smith and Mikiki for an R-rated evening of explicit writing from four of Canada’s top talents. TRANSGRESS is a sinfully sexy and genderbending celebration of transgressive writing. The lineup, curated by Marcus McCann, includes Sean Horlor, Todd Klinck, Nairne Holtz and Governor General’s Award winner Daniel MacIvor.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $30


saturday, october 25

NOON

 

  • NEW SCIENCE SERIES:
    Steven Pinker on Language as a Window into
    Human Nature
    Hosted by Sarah Dearing


    What do your words say about you? Steven Pinker, acclaimed professor at Harvard, Stanford and the Massachussetts Institute of Technology, and bestselling author of The Language Instinct and How The Mind Works, has revolutionized the way we think about language. Is there a separate thing called “mind,” or does the brain and its workings create an illusion of a separate thing called mind? Join the conversation on his latest bestseller, The Stuff of Thought, where he explores what words actually mean and how we use them, describes how we use space and motion as metaphors for more abstract ideas, and uncovers the deeper structures of human thought that have been shaped by evolutionary history.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40

2:00 PM

  • NEW SCIENCE SERIES: CLIMATE CHANGE
    With Jay Ingram and Andrew Weaver
    Hosted by Carleton University's Elyn Humphreys


    Climate change is no longer a vague threat. Join the conversation on a path toward a sustainable future with two leading experts in the field. Jay Ingram, host of the Discovery Channel’s Daily Planet and winner of the Canadian Science Writers Book Award, returns with The Daily Planet Book Of Cool Ideas, exploring what we can do to reverse global warming and what people are doing to create a sustainable future. Dr. Andrew Weaver, Canada Research Chair in Climate Modeling and Analysis at the University of Victoria and lead author of the Nobel Prize winning United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, makes his Festival debut with Keeping Our Cool: Canada in a Warming World.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40


2:00 PM

 

  • BOOK LAUNCH: JAILBREAKS AND RE-CREATIONS:
    99 CANADIAN SONNETS
    With Zachariah Wells
    Hosted by Stephen Brockwell

    In 1910, Lawrence J. Burpee published an anthology of 100 Canadian sonnets. Poet and critic Zachariah Wells figured it was high time for an update on that dusty tome. In Jailbreaks, Wells has gathered 99 of his favourite sonnets written by Canadians, from the 19th century to the present day. Jailbreaks does much to question the standard assumption that the best Canadian poetry is written in free verse, while showcasing the enormous versatility of the sonnet and of the poets who use it as a vessel for their thoughts and feelings. Jailbreaks just might change the way we think about Canadian poetry.

    A free event.

4:00 PM

 

  • THE BIG IDEA: EXPORTING DEMOCRACY
    With Eric S. Margolis and James Traub
    Hosted by Neil Wilson


    Join the conversation on the “clash of civilizations” and the outcome of Western efforts to shape democracy around the world. Eric S. Margolis, an award-winning, internationally syndicated columnist and author of American Raj: Liberation or Domination? takes us into the thinking and worldview of anti-Western Islamic radicals, and identifies the historical, political and religious factors that have played such a huge role in generating hostility in the West. In The Freedom Agenda, James Traub, a journalist for The New York Times Magazine, describes the rise and fall of the Freedom Agenda during the Bush years, offering a richly detailed portrait of the administration’s largely failed efforts to bolster democratic forces abroad.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40

4:00 PM

 

  • MASTERCLASS SERIES: THE ART OF NONFICTION
    With Norman Snider and Mark Frutkin
    Hosted by The Citizen's Kate Heartfield

    What are the key ingredients in writing great non-fiction? Join host Kate Heartfield for a conversation on developing voice and style in non-fiction with two acclaimed wordsmiths. Journalist, essayist and screenwriter Norman Snider is the author of The Roaring Eighties and Other Good Times. Author, poet and winner of the Trillium Book Award, Mark Frutkin turns to non-fiction for his latest, Erratic North: A Vietnam Draft Resister’s Life in the Canadian Bush.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members

5:30 PM

 

 

6:00 PM

 

  • THE WRITING LIFE #4: THE SECRET HISTORY
    Bill Gaston, David Bergen and Rawi Hage

    Hosted by Sean Wilson

    If we could read the secret history of our enemies, we should find... sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostility.
    -Longfellow

    Bill Gaston, winner of the Timothy Findley Prize and the ReLit Award, returns with The Order of Good Cheer, described in the Winnipeg Free Press as “a feast of nuanced writing, blessed with one of those rare endings that are absolutely perfect.” Bestselling novelist and Giller Prize winner
    David Bergen
    returns with The Retreat, praised in the Montreal Gazette as “a powerful and engrossing novel, further proof that [he] is now one of Canada’s very best writers.” Rawi Hage, winner of the Prix des libraires du Québec and the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, returns with Cockroach, acclaimed in the Ottawa Citizen as “an amazingly original and brilliant novel that shows he is no one-hit wonder, but a major force in Canadian literature.”

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40

8:00 PM

 

  • POETRY CABARET
    Meredith Quartermain, Dannabang Kuwabong and Monty Reid
    Hosted by Rhonda Douglas


    Monty Reid, winner of the Lampman-Scott Award, returns with The Luskville Reductions, a long poem that records a year in the life of a small Quebec town. Dannabang Kuwabong makes his Festival debut with his fourth poetry collection, Caribbean Blues and Love’s Genealogy, which emerges from an historical reconnection with the poet’s African ancestors who were taken to the Caribbean. Meredith Quartermain, winner of the BC Book Awards Prize for Poetry, makes her debut with two bold new collections: Matter, which unearths the relations between humans, language and the planet, and Nightmarker, which explores the human city.

    Meredith Quartermain appears thanks to the Writers' Union of Canada.


    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40


sunday, october 26

NOON

 

  • NEW SCIENCE SERIES:
    John W. Moffat on Reinventing Gravity
    Hosted by Sean Wilson

    In Reinventing Gravity, John W. Moffat, professor emeritus at the University of Toronto and adjunct professor at the University of Waterloo, introduces us to groundbreaking new ideas about the universe. His is a bold revision of one of the most successful theories of all time: Einstein’s general theory of relativity. As we know, Einstein’s theory does not work in the world of the very small or the world of the very large. Moffat has developed a modified theory of gravity without resorting to the dubious yet long-claimed excuse of the existence of invisible “dark matter.”

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40


2:00 PM

  • STATE OF OUR LITERARY CULTURE
    with Stephen Henighan, Terry Fallis
    and Bill Gaston. Hosted by Sarah Dearing

    Event curator Sarah Dearing, winner of the City of Toronto Book Award, hosts a spirited, honest discussion about the current state of Canadian fiction. This conversation grows from James Kellman’s Festival appearance a number of years ago, when he rather vehemently accused Canadian writers of having “one foot planted in Old England, the other in New England without a truthful voice of our own.” Join the conversation with Stephen Henighan, author of The Afterlife of Culture, Terry Fallis, recipient of this year’s Leacock Prize for his self-published novel, Best Laid Plans, and ReLit winner Bill Gaston, the acclaimed author of The Order of Good Cheer.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40


4:00 PM

 

  • LIVING HISTORY SERIES: CHAMPLAIN'S DREAM
    With Pulitzer Prize Winner David Hackett Fischer
    Hosted by Carleton University's Brian McKillop


    David Hackett Fischer, University Professor at Brandeis University, won the Pulitzer Prize in 2005 for Washington’s Crossing. His latest book, Champlain’s Dream, is the enthralling story of an adventurer who was also an able leader with a rare vision for a new world founded on harmony and respect – where Europeans and Aboriginals would cooperate for mutual benefit. A complex, elusive man among many colourful characters, Samuel de Champlain participated in palace intrigues, endured raging storms at sea and fought with his Indian allies in ferocious wars.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40


4:00 PM

 

  • THROUGH BLACK SPRUCE:
    One on One with Joseph Boyden
    Hosted by CBC Radio's Laurence Wall

    CBC Radio’s Laurence Wall hosts Joseph Boyden, winner of the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize and the McNally Robinson Aboriginal Book of the Year Award for his first novel, Three Day Road, an international phenomenon.

    His follow-up, Through Black Spruce, is a powerful novel of contemporary Aboriginal life, full of the dangers and harsh beauty of both forest and city. Through Black Spruce is an unforgettable consideration of how we discover who we really are. Tomson Highway calls it “an arresting novel with unexpected twists and turns” and “an important contribution to the Native literary voice in this country.”

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40

5:30 PM

 

 

  • DINNER IN THE FOYER
    Provided by Jam Delights Catering
    (613-816-2453
    )

    Join us for jerk chicken, vegetable curry, long grain rice, fried plantain, and green salad.

6:00 PM

 

  • THE WRITING LIFE #5: ONLY THE PAST
    Kenneth J. Harvey, Damon Galgut and Amitav Ghosh
    Hosted by The Citizen's Kate Heartfield

    There is no present or future, only the past, happening over and over again, now.
    -Eugene O’Neill

    Spend the evening with three of the most celebrated and acclaimed authors in the world. Fifteen years in the making, Kenneth J. Harvey’s epic masterwork about Newfoundland’s working class, Blackstrap Hawco, is, in the words of Alastair MacLeod, “universal in its grip upon the human soul.” Booker nominee Damon Galgut’s The Impostor is a powerful tale of isolation and revenge in modern-day South Africa. Winner of the Prix Medici Étranger, Sahitya Akademi Award and the Pushcart Prize, Amitav Ghosh makes his Festival debut with the Booker Prize nominated Sea Of Poppies.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members
    Day Pass: $40


8:00 PM

 

  • RELIT AWARDS
    with Roberta Rees, Gillian Wigmore
    and Gil Adamson
    Hosted by Kenneth J. Harvey

    Don’t miss the 2008 ReLit Awards ceremony and readings. Congratulate the winners and pick up a free book from the 2008 ReLit longlist! This year’s winner for Short Fiction is Long After Fathers by Roberta Rees (Coteau). The Poetry Award goes to Soft Geography by Gillian Wigmore (Caitlin), the Novel Award to The Outlander by Gil Adamson (Anansi).

    A free event.


MONday, october 27

7:00 PM

 

  • THE BRIEF WONDROUS LIFE OF OSCAR WAO:
    One on One with Junot Díaz
    Hosted by CBC Radio's Adrian Harewood


    His debut short story collection Drown made Junot Díaz a literary star. More than ten years later, his follow-up, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, was the most talked about—and praised—first novel of 2007, and winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Join us for a conversation with the acclaimed author of the book described by Time magazine as “astoundingly great.” Entertainment Weekly calls it “a joy to read, and every bit as exhilarating to reread,” and the New York Times lauds it as “an extraordinarily vibrant book that’s fueled by adrenaline-powered prose.” Encapsulating Dominican-American history, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao opens our eyes to an astonishing vision of the contemporary American experience and explores the endless human capacity to persevere—and risk all—in the name of love.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members

8:30 PM

  • SONGWRITERS CIRCLE
    Glenn Nuotio, Kyrie Kristmanson, and Justin Rutledge
    Hosted by CBC Radio's Alan Neal


    The Fall Edition concludes with the incomparable Glenn Nuotio, everyone’s favourite half-Finnish Newfoundlander living in Ottawa; rising international star Kyrie Kristmanson, whose second release, Pagan Love, showcases her work with voice, guitar, trumpet and typewriter; and NOW Magazine’s 2006 Best Toronto songwriter, Justin Rutledge, whose acclaimed third album, Man Descending was inspired by the Guy Vanderhaeghe novel.

    $15 General / $10 Student or Senior / Free for Members


 

 

 

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