Fourth Issue of Our Literary Journal Foment

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25
Tuesday
Apr

5 Festival Pairings for Date Night

No matter who you are taking out – a friend, family member, partner or someone new – date night calls for tasty food, a good drink, and conversation that brings you together. With delicious dinners served up by Mike Beck of Dash Mobile Cookery , local beers from Bicycle Brewery, delicious wines, Bridgehead snacks, and more, our festival is the perfect place for your next evening out. Want to treat yourself? Forget about taking a book with you – you are sure to make a new friend in our Festival Café. Here are five festival pairings to help you plan your next date night out in Ottawa.

4. Spice Up Your Monday with the Art of Seduction

Does your date consider tantric sex research? Are you exploring polyamory for the first time? Bisexuality? Curious? Let award winning novelist Karen Connelly seduce you with The Changeroom and the personal and sexual exploration that went on behind writing this titillating new novel. Too hot under the collar? Don’t worry – Elise Levine’s watery caves and Lori McNulty’s keen eye for human interaction will balance the evening and add a few laughs. If you are planning on joining us for dinner, well then we have to recommend the grilled vegetable pasta salad with artichoke dressing, and a bottle of Steam Whistle or a glass of our light white wine so that you and your date (or just yourself) are ready to go home and unwind.

5. Tuesday Night Politics Punch Close to Home

Does your date follow Question Period daily? Are they consumed by the NDP and Conservative leadership races? Can’t get them to stop talking about Macron and Le Pen? We take a look at the rise of the radical right in Canada with Conservative Party insider, and former Mulroney Cabinet Minister, Tom McMillan with the aim of answering the question: Can it happen here? It will take more than a spoonful of sugar to wash down these truths that hit a bit too close to home, so we recommend our favourite local brew, Bicycle Brewery’s Velocipede IPA, and a mouthful of Dash Mobile’s signature Walnut Flax Burger. To take the edge-off escape with some fiction as Steven Heighton , Andrew Westoll and Susan Perly take us around the world through the beautiful and the absurd.

So grab a different date for every night of our festival, or bring yourself and come meet someone new. Treat yourself with some good food and a new book at the our festival from April 27 - May 2. Our Festival Café is open at 5PM every day and our events are always serving up something new.

Past Date Ideas

1. Thursday Night: Smash the Patriarchy with White Wine and a Rueben

Your date was part of the Women’s March earlier this year, attended The Ghomeshi Effect in January, or keeps talking about feminism. If this sounds like the one you want to take out on Thursday night then you have two fierce memoirs to choose from. At 6:30PM we host Canada’s first female infantry officer Sandra Perron whose stark and honest memoir details her experiences and the reality of many women in the military. From verbal abuse, to physical harassment and sexual assault, Perron exposes the threads of one of our most patriarchal systems. During the break grab a hearty veggie Reuben sandwich with sauerkraut, swiss and special sauce, then order a glass of Angel’s Gate Riesling and get ready to smash the patriarchy with Scaachi Koul. With wit, sarcasm and irony, Koul’s essays cut close the bone as she discusses everything from family to friendship, racism to feminism, Indian weddings to Twitter trolls, because one day we’ll all be dead and none of this will matter – but these issues matter to us all today.

2. A Saturday Swim through Science and Conciousness

Do discussions about the universe, conciousness and our existence fill your time together? Come with open hearts, minds and bellies on Saturday night as science and philosophy collide when we sit down with theoretical physicist Sean Carroll to talk about the origins and meaning of the universe and life itself(!). An event that is sure to leave you craving sustenance, grab a Chickpea and rice burrito with curry crema and coleslaw, and a glass of our Malivoire before the event or chow down in the cafe once it'd over.

3. Sunday: Snack on Some Food for Thought

For those who prefer a mid-afternoon date and are eternally curious, Sunday is for you. Canadian science writer and Discovery Channel host Jay Ingram is back in Ottawa exploring The Science of Why. This event is for people of all ages who want to learn more about the natural – from cats to campfire smoke – and unnatural worlds – including subliminal messaging and bigfoot. Grab a coffee and some fresh tasty treats from Bridgehead or samosas from Rinag, and stick around for a conversation about theatre from the Jewish and Palestinian diasporas with Stephen Orlov and Samah Sabawi.



Check out our full festival schedule for more great date ideas.

20
Thursday
Apr

Great Canadian Fiction

For the second half of our festival we are showcasing some our country's best writer and bringing them together for conversations about the power of fiction to change the way we see the world and how we relate to those around us.

April 30 • 8:30PM: The Illegal with Lawrence Hill
Winner of the Governor General's Award for History and 2016 Canada Reads Champion Lawrence Hill is coming to our festival to discuss his most recent novel: The Illegal. Here Hill is at his best writing a depiction of life on the borderlands of society that urges us to consider the plight of the unseen and the forgotten who live among us. Hosted by CBC Ottawa's Joanne Chianello. Learn more and get tickets.

May 1 • 8:30PM: What You Want with Karen Connelly, Lori McNulty & Karen Connelly
Governor General Award winning author Karen Connelly returns with a seductive new novel that questions the lives and sexual identities we have built. Acclaimed short story writer Elise Levine takes readers underwater in her debut novel. Lori McNulty's debut collection of short stories Life on Mars examines our humanity here on planet Earth. With local writer Rhonda Douglas as our host, these great Canadian authors will get us to take a closer look at the lives we live. Learn more and get tickets.

May 2• 8:30PM: The Only Journey with Steven Heighton, Susan Perly & Andrew Westoll
The Amazon, an abandoned Cyprus holiday resort, the front lines in Afghanistan, we will travel around the world and through time with three new novels that question our reality and fantasy, our perceptions of the world and those who are in control. With host Peter Schneider of the Canada Council, Steven Heighton, Susan Perly and Andrew Westoll will take us around the world and to the furthest reaches of our imagination. Learn more and get tickets.

You might also like:
150 Years of Great Canadian Storytelles with Douglas Gibson
At Home in the World with Heather O'Neill & Mary Walsh 
The Bond Between Us with Barbara Gowdy and Claire Cameron  

Coming in June 2017: Louise Penny, Ivan Coyote 
15
Saturday
Apr

Stories of the Diaspora

This spring writers from Ottawa, across Canada and around the world will be at our festival to talk about our personal and cultural identities, and how storytelling can foster inclusion on a local and international scale.

April 30 • 2PM: Bridging the Disapora: Jewish and Palestinian Plays with Samah Sabawi 
Writing and performance can be some of the best ways to break down the barriers between culture. In their new collection of plays by Israeli and Palestinian writers from around the world,  Stephen Orlov  and  Samah Sabawi  capture a range of perspectives about what it means to be Jewish, Israeli, Palestinian, and Muslim. Thye will talk with GCTC's Arthur Milner about this groundbreaking new anthology Learn more and get tickets.

April 30 • 4PM: Book Launch: the Muslimah Who Fell to Earth personal essays by Canadian Muslim Women  
In the  Muslimah Who Fell to Earth  editor  Saima S. Hussain  gathers twenty-one personal stories told by women, all challenging conventions and stereotypes, and united by two ideas—Islam (or the Quran) and nationality (Canadian). Join us for the launch of this important collection featuring contributors and writers from Ottawa Learn more and get tickets.

May 1 • 6:30PM: One on One with Anita Desai  
Born in India before partition to a German mother and Bengali father, Anita Desai grew up in a household always on the edge of difference and change. In school she would learn English, which she would go on to write in for the rest of her life. The author of 17 novels, novellas and children's books, she has been nominated for the Man Booker Prize three times: in 1980 for  Clear Light of Day , in 1984 for  In Custody  and in 1999 for  Fasting, Feasting . Learn more and get tickets.

April 27 • 6:30PM: Monia Mazigh Confrton Revolution in Hope Has Two Daughters
Having missed the riots of the Arab Spring in her home country of Tunisia,  Monia Mazigh  turned to writing as a way to reconnect with her homeland. Drawing on her own experiences from the Tunisian Bread Riots, Mazigh's novel explores the relationships of mothers and daughters, and the forces that push us both to speak up as activists and to keep our heads down.  Mazigh will be part of opening night with  Raiyah Patel  and  Sandra Perron . Learn more and get tickets.

You might also like:
One Day this Will Matter with Scaachi Koul
Children's Literature from Ireland
14
Friday
Apr

Women Making Waves

This spring we are dedicating opening night to outspoken women who know what it is like to live and work in the changing landscape of our country, and celebrating Canadian women novelists on night two. The personal has never been more political, and the women writers coming to our festival from April 27 - May 2 know this to be true.

April 27 6:30PM: A Woman's Work: Advocate, Soldier, Revolutionary
The evening will bridge the age gap as student activist Raiyah Patel, speaking as part of the Nobel Women’s Initiative, joins Sandra Perron, one of Canada’s first infantry soldiers, and Ottawa author Monia Mazigh to talk about the important role women play in advocating for change and human rights.

April 27 • 8:30PM: One Day this Will Matter with Scaachi Koul
BuzzFeed writer and cultural critic Scaachi Koul  will be talk about her witty and moving book of personal essays that covers everything from social anxiety to family squabbles, body shaming to racism. Her book made us laugh, cry and scream in frustration, and we can't wait for Koul to talk with CBC Ottawa's Lucy van Oldenbarneveld.

April 28 • 6:30PM: The Bond Between Us
Barbara Gowdy and Claire Cameron return to Ottawa each with new novels that explore our complex relationships with family, history and the ones we love. Get tickets and read more about Gowdy's Little Sister and Cameron's The Last Neanderthal here.

April 28 8:30PM: At Home in the World
In one of our best pairings yet, we’ll get a taste of humour and talent from Montreal’s  Heather O’Neill and debut novelist (but experienced comedian) Mary Walsh. O'Neill's new novel blurs the lines of childhood and adulthood, fantasy and reality, in one of her best stories yet, while Walsh takes us into the intimate lives of residents in 1960s Newfoundland. Get tickets and read more here.

You might also like:
Bridging the Disapora: Jewish and Palestinian Plays with Samah Sabawi
Book Launch: the Muslimah Who Fell to Earth personal essays by Canadian Muslim Women
One on One with Anita Desai

12
Wednesday
Apr

Spring Edition Brings the World to Ottawa

(Ottawa, April 12, 2017) In it’s most eclectic edition to date the Ottawa International Writers Festival celebrates writers, books and ideas against a backdrop of rising world populism, Islamophobia, and a growing democratic deficit. From April 27 to May 2, forty acclaimed writers from across Canada and around the world will engage the Nation’s Capital in conversations about our cultural differences and similarities, our political and artistic leanings, and most of all our personal histories and public personas.


“This spring we are dedicating opening night to outspoken women who know what it is like to live and work in the changing landscape of our country. The personal has never been more political,” says Artistic Director Sean Wilson. The evening will bridge the age gap as student activist Raiyah Patel, speaking as part of the Nobel Women’s Initiative, joins Sandra Perron, one of Canada’s first infantry soldiers, and Ottawa author Monia Mazigh to talk about the important role women play in advocating for change and human rights. Following this trifecta of inspiring women, BuzzFeed writer and cultural critic Scaachi Koul will be talking about her witty and moving book of personal essays that cover everything from social anxiety to family squabbles, body shaming to racism.


Women will also own the stage the festival stage on the second evening with a focus on fiction. “We’re really looking forward to having Barbara Gowdy and Claire Cameron return to Ottawa with new novels that explore our complex relationships with family, history and the ones we love. Then in one of our best pairings yet, we’ll get a taste of humour and talent with Montreal’s Heather O’Neill and debut novelist (but experienced comedian) Mary Walsh .”


Throughout the festival, the writers will cover a range of genres and themes.


Seeing into Science

Peer into the origins of the universe on Saturday April 29 with theoretical physicist Sean Carroll, whose book The Big Picture explores the complexities of how the world functions at the quantum, cosmic and human level. The exploration of science will continue with popular science journalist Jay Ingram whose new book The Science of Why , get to the scientific reasons for every day occurrences.


Identity and Inclusion

“We are really excited to have writers from Ottawa, across Canada and around the world coming to our city to talk about our personal and cultural identities and how storytelling can foster inclusion on a local and international scale,” says Wilson.


On April 30, the festival will shine a light on the Jewish and Palestinian diaspora as playwrights Samah Sabawi and Peter Orlov sit down with GCTC’s Arthur Milner to talk about their groundbreaking collection of plays. Following this discussion, the festival will host the launch of The Muslimah Who Fell to Earth , a collection of essays about the experience of Muslim women in Canada, featuring readings by Ottawa contributors. In the evening award winning author Lawrence Hill and CBC host Joanne Chianello look at how fiction can build understanding around refugees in his acclaimed novel The Illegal. The following day, three time Booker Prize nominated author and 2017 Blue Metropolis Grand Prix Award winner Anita Desai will discuss her decades spanning career and what it means for her fiction to resonate from India across the globe.


The festival will also hear from veteran storyteller and gay rights advocate Jan Andrews whose new performance about coming out late in life explore the different experiences of coming out and acceptance for gay and transgendered individuals of yesterday and today. Earlier in the weekend, three Irish writers whose YA fiction explores consent in personal relationships suggest once again that the imagination is our most precious natural resource.


History, Politics and Protest

“Looking back is one of the surest ways to move forward,” says Wilson, “and this spring our non-fiction writers will give readers an opportunity to reflect on where we have come from and where we are going.”


To mark Canada’s 150th, storyteller Douglas Gibson will cover 150 years of storytellers, English, French and Indigenous, on April 30th. That evening, social activist and organiser Mark Engler will look at the history of protest around the world and offer tips for the activists of today and tomorrow.


Marking another significant anniversary, Carleton University professor and award winning historian Tim Cook will take us back to Vimy Ridge to better understand the facts of the day and why it stands out as a significant moment in Canadian history. The festival will then look at the politics dominating headlines today with Tom McMillan and host John Geddes, of Maclean’s Magazine, as they look at the history of the Conservative Party of Canada and the rise of the radical right in Canada and abroad.


Good Stories and Good Food

As always, the festival will feature some of the best canadian fiction writers of the day including Governor General Award Winner Karen Connelly on May 1, Steven Heighton and Andrew Westoll on May 2, and a free fiction event featuring Ray Robertson at The Manx on April 30th.


“At its heart the festival is about more than books, it is about bringing people together and sparking conversation and debate, and food is a sure way to bring people together,” says Wilson. Now in its second year, the Writers Festival Cafe will offer local beer by Bicycle Brewery, coffee and snacks from Bridgehead, as well as wine and nonalcoholic beverages which guest can pair with a home cooked meal from Dash Mobile Cookery .


The Ottawa International Writers Festival runs from April 22 - May 2 with most events taking place at Christ Church Cathedral. For details, dates and the complete line-up please go to writersfestival.org .

 
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Media Enquiries - Sean Wilson, Artistic Director: sean@writersfestival.org
12
Wednesday
Oct
2016

Irish Culture and History

On October 22nd we are featuring two Irish writers at our festival for two fresh looks at the culture and history of Ireland. 


The Easter Uprising of 1916 with Dermot Keogh
@2PM
The insurrection of Easter Week, 1916 led to the creation of the Irish Republic and continues to have a profound impact on Irish politics and the Brexit fallout. As we commemorate the 100th anniversary of this seminal event Dr. Dermot Keogh, Emeritus Professor of History, University College Cork, will put the political and international aspects of The Rising into context and engage us in a lively conversation that will weave together the many threads that underpin contemporary Ireland. Click for tickets and details.

Prosperity Drive by Mary Morrissy
@6:30PM
Mary Morrissy is the winner of the Hennessy Award and a Lannan Literary Foundation Award and has published three previous novels: Mother of Pearl, The Pretenderand The Rising of Bella Casey -- and a collection of short stories, A Lazy Eye (1993).  Her most recent novel, Prosperity Drive , has been praised by both The Guardian  for its "compassion, immediacy, humour and delicacy"  and The Irish Times, "clear-eyed vision and her deep compassion, along with her lovely sense of the comic and her exceptional literary articulacy, make this an outstanding collection." All the characters in Prosperity Drive  begin their journeys on a single suburban Dublin street, and everything eventually returns to it. It is an Ireland in miniature. The novel is laid out in stories, linked by characters who appear and disappear, bump into each other in chance encounters, and join up again through love, marriage or memory. She currently teaches at University College Cork. Morrissy will be joined on stage by Man Booker Prize nominee David Szalay and debut novelist Jowita Bydlowska. Click here for tickets and details.
11
Tuesday
Oct
2016

A Window into Canada

Identity shapes how we see the world and how others interact with us. Through fiction, poetry and journalism, these writers illuminate the realisties of  racism, isolation, identity and history for Indigenous people across Canada. Writing offers a new window onto the world and through their books stories these Indigeous writers are shifting the conversation about Idigenous rights in Canada.


Wrist by Nathan Adler's Wrist

October 21 @ 8:30PM
Nathan Adler is a member of Lac Des Mille Lacs First Nation. His debut novel Wrist is an indigenous monster story that will draw you into the lives and stories of the Ojibway people. In 1872, a group of dinosaur hunters in northern Ontario were driven made by a bizarre and frightening illness. Over a hundred years later, the same illness threatens Church and his family. He must delve into his family’s dark history to protect the secrets of his people. He will be part of our Paranormal Prose panel with Kelley Armstrong and Kristi CharishClick here for tickets and information.


Passage by Gwen Benaway
October 23 @ 8:30PM
Two-spirited Indigenous poet Gwen Benaway’s new collection of poetry, Passage, explores the the effects of violence and the burden of survival for indigenous people. The poems in her collection take readers from Northern Ontario to the Great Lakes, looking at family issues, a legacy of colonization and a new sexuality and gender. She will be joined by Vivek Shraya and Ivan Coyote. Click here for tickets and information.


The Break by Katherena Vermette
October 24 @ 6:30PM
When Stella, a young Métis mother, looks out her window one evening and spots someone in trouble on the Break—a barren field on an isolated strip of land outside her house—she calls the police to alert them to a possible crime.   The Break, nominated for the 2016 Writers Trust Award for Fiction and the Governor General's Award, by Katherena Vermette, presents a series of shifting narratives, people who are connected, both directly and indirectly, with the victim—police, family, and friends—tell their personal stories leading up to that fateful night. Through their various perspectives a larger, more comprehensive story about lives of the residents in Winnipeg’s North End is exposed. Vermette will be joined by Zoe Whittall and David Bergen. Click here for tickets and information.

Invisible North by Alexandra Shimo
October 24 @ 8:30PM
When freelance journalist   Alexandra Shimo   arrives in Kashechewan, a fly-in northern Ontario reserve, to investigate rumours of a fabricated water crisis and document its deplorable living conditions, she finds herself drawn into the troubles of the reserve. Unable to cope with the desperate conditions, she begins to fall apart. Part memoir, part history of the Canadian reserves,  Invisible North: The Search for Answers on a Troubled Reserve   offers a vivid first-person account of life on a troubled reserve that illuminates a difficult and oft-ignored history.   She will be joined by Deborah Campbell and Joy Kogawa. Click here for tickets and information.

A Postcolonial Performance of scenes from The Tempest
October 25 at 6:30PM
As we celebrate the 400 years since Shakespeare's death with Margaret Atwood and retelling of The Tempest in Hag-Seed, we are also inviting Keith Barker  and  Walter Borden to present a Canadian, post-colonial reimagining of some of the key scenes from The Tempest.  Click here for tickets and information.

Witness, I Am with Gregory Schofield
October 26 @ 8:30PM

Gregory Scofield is of Métis of Cree, European and Jewish descent. In his new work, Witness, I am, he addresses themes of identify and belonging and the issue of missing and murdered indigenous women. He weaves  his personal perspective and knowledge of indigenous culture into his work, creating poems that are powerful and moving. Schofield will be part of our Poetry Cabaret with Sandra Ridley, Stuart Ross and Stephen Brockwell.  Click here for tickets and information.

11
Tuesday
Oct
2016

Stories from Behind the Firing Line

This fall four writers take us behind the firing line with stories about war and the people it affects. Drawing on personal experiences, as soldiers, journalists and researchers, each writer places the realities of war in perspective with accounts not often told on the outside.


Trigger Warning with Deni Ellis Bechard, Peter Behrens and Kevin  Patterson

October 23 @ 6:30 pm

In one panel we bring together three novelists who question and explore the theatre of war. In his novel, Into the Sun, Deni Ellis Bechard paints an unsentimental portrait of the impact journalists, mercenaries, messianic idealists, and aid workers have when they flood into war zones. Bechard brings Kabul to life, portraying citizens who are determined, resourceful and as willing as their occupiers to reinvent themselves and survive. Peter Behrens’ Carry Me, is both a love story and a historical epic. The reader gains a fresh perspective on Europe’s violent twentieth century, from the Isle of Wight to London under Zeppelin attack to Germany  during the Weimar period. Kevin Patterson’s new novel News From the Red Desert begins in 2001 when everyone thought the conflict in Afghanistan was over. The novel then delves into the mess, confusion and death of a war that was not yet won, and the lives of the men and women involved. Click here for tickets.

A Disappearance in Damascus
October 25 @ 8:30 pm
In the midst of an unfolding international crisis, journalist Deborah Campbell, undercover in Damascus to report on the exodus of Iraqis into Syria following the overthrow of Saddam Hussein, finds herself swept up in the mysterious disappearance of Ahlam, her guide and friend. Haunted by the prospect that their work together has led to her friend’s arrest, Campbell spends the months that follow desperately trying to find her—all the while fearing she could be next. A Disappearance in Damascus: A Story of Friendship and Survival in the Shadow of War  is a frank, personal account of a journey through fear, and the triumph of friendship and courage. Campbell will join Alexandra Shimo and Joy Kogawa to talk about the crossover between journalism and memoir. Click here for tickets.

An Ongoing Battle with PTSD with Romeo Dallaire
November 30th @ 7pm
Roméo Dallaire, traumatized by witnessing genocide on an imponderable scale in Rwanda, reflects in these pages on the nature of PTSD and the impact of that deep wound on his life since 1994, and on how he motivates himself and others to humanitarian work despite his constant struggle. Dallaire wll talk about his struggles with PTSD and how it has motivated him to help soldiers better deal with the muddy reality of modern conflict zones and to revolutionizing our thinking about the changing nature of conflict itself. Click here for tickets.

10
Monday
Oct
2016

Women Making A Difference

Standing up and saying something is the first step to making a difference. This fall our festival is showcasing some amazing women writers whose memoirs and fictions shed light on important social issues, such as quality of life on Canadian reserves, war, immigrant experience, sexual assault and gender identity. Be part of the conversation and stand up to make your own change at these fall events.


The Personal is Political. What does it mean to visit the site of disaster? What is it life to live it? And what do you do once you are a witness? In their memoirs, journalists Deborah Campbell and Alexandra Shimo share their experiences of working on the front lines of journalism in the Middle East and on Canadian reserves. In Gently from Nagasaki, award-winning author Joy Kogawa traces lines between her family's time spent in Japanese internment in Canada and the events unfolding in Japan at the same time. Do not miss these unbelievable stories of strength, perseverance and the desire to drive change. They join us on October 24th.

Fiction Mirrors Fact. Two astounding Canadian novelists explore the darker sides of our family ties on October 24th. Nominated for the Giller Prize, Zoe Whittall's The Best Kind of People takes peers into the darkness that is sexual assualt to understand how it affects the victims and the family of the accused. Set in Winnipeg's West End, Katherena Vermette's Governor Genral's Award nominated book The Break explores the urban indigenous experience from cultural loss to prejudice and family breakdown.

Walking the Line. In their new works of poetry, Vivek Shraya and Gwen Beneway explore both the racial, cultural and gender lines they cross in their lives and art. In Passage , two-spirited trans poet, Gwen Benaway's poems travel from Northern Ontario and across the Great Lakes in poetic voyage through divorce, family violence, legacy of colonization, and the affirmation of a new sexuality and gender. Vivek Shrayas debut collection,   even this page is white, is a bold, timely, and personal interrogation of skin–its origins, functions, and limitations. They will perform on October 23rd.

Truth in Character. In our Character Studies panel, Jowita Bydlowska and Mary Morrissy crawl into the intimate and personal lives of their characters to show us how they think and what makes them tick. Bydlowska's Guy investigates the elements that contribute to toxic masculinity, while Morrissy's Prosperity Drive takes on an Alice Munro approach to the private lives of the men and women that live in the Irish suburbs.

Spotlight on Jane Jacobs. On October 22nd we are putting a spotlight on the woman who radically changed how we see cities and think about infrastructure and design. Two new books take a look at the life of Jane Jacobs, her thoughts and the contributions she made in New York City, Toronto and around the world.


10
Monday
Oct
2016

Passed Down Through Generations


Talking to The Guardian about her debut novel Harmless Like You, Rowan Hisayo Buchanan discussed the need to write a variety of characters: “The standard character was a white person,” she says. “I get really excited when I read writers who write people who, let’s be honest, don’t have my exact racial makeup but who are mixed-up in that way.” In her novel Buchanan not only gives voice to Yuki, a half-Japanese woman, but to the fraught relationships between generations of generations: “A lot of what the book is about is how pain shape-shifts down the generations. There is nothing more personal than family, and yet families are so profoundly affected by political decisions,” she told The Guardian. Buchanan is not the only writer at our festival to be exploring the theme of inherited trauma. From Canadian Japanese internment camps, to urban Indigenous life and the immigrants experience, our writers give voice to the darker side of family inheritance.

Time After Time. Rowan Hisayo Buchanan joins Jenn Sookfong Lee and Terry Jordan for a conversation about how fiction can open up the conversation about the unexpected trajectories each decision can set in motion and the lingering echo of the road not taken. Buchanan's book examines the conflicts between generations of Japanese immigrants to America. Lee's book looks at the secrets kept between mother and daughter and the gap between privilege and desire. Jordan's book takes readers through the rise and fall of fishing life in Newfoundland.

Family Matters. When Stella, a young Métis mother, looks out her window one evening and spots someone in trouble on the Break—a barren field on an isolated strip of land outside her house—she calls the police to alert them to a possible crime.    The Break  by  Katherena Vermett  presents a comprehensive story about lives of the residents in Winnipeg’s North End is exposed. David Bergen's Stranger is a stirring tale that lays bare the bonds of motherhood, revealing just how far a mother will go to reclaim her stolen child. Íso, a young Guatemalan, works at a fertility clinic at Ixchel, where she becomes the secret lover of an American doctor, Eric Mann. After the birth of her daughter, the baby is taken from her and sent to America. Determined to reclaim her stolen daughter, Íso makes her way north through Mexico, eventually crossing illegally into a United States divided into military zones.

Gently to Nagasaki. Set in Vancouver and Toronto, the outposts of Slocan and Coaldale, the streets of Nagasaki and the high mountains of Shikoku, Japan,   Gently to Nagasaki   is also an account of a remarkable life. As a child during WWII, Joy Kogawa was interned with her family and thousands of other Japanese Canadians by the Canadian government. Her acclaimed novel Obasan, based on that experience, brought her literary recognition and played a critical role in the movement for redress. In her new book, interweaving the events of her own life with catastrophes like the bombing of Nagasaki and the massacre by the Japanese imperial army at Nanking, she wrestles with essential questions like good and evil, love and hate, rage and forgiveness, determined above all to arrive at her own truths.

Kay’s Lucky Coin Variety.  Ann Y. K. Choi   is a coming-of-age story that portrays the life of a young Korean Canadian girl who will not give up on her dreams or her family. Family secrets, a lost sister, forbidden loves, domestic assaults—Mary discovers as she grows up in the 1980s that life is much more complicated than she had ever imagined. Her secret passion for her English teacher is filled with problems, and with the arrival of a promising Korean suitor, Joon-Ho, events escalate in ways that she could never have imagined, catching the entire family in a web of deceit and violence. 

Do Not Say We Have Nothing. Nominated for the Man Booker Prize and the Governor General's Award, Madeleine Thien's new novel takes a look at the enduring effect of the Cultural Revolution in China. Set in China before, during and after the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Thien takes us inside an extended family in China, showing us the lives of two successive generations–those who lived through Mao’s Cultural Revolution in the mid-twentieth century; and the children of the survivors, who became the students protesting in Tiananmen Square in 1989, in one of the most important political moments of the past century.