In Flanders Fields with Tim Cook, Mary Janigan, and Roméo Dallaire

Torrential rain and broken umbrellas didn't stop the excited audience from filling up the pews in the cozy and brightly lit Centretown United Church. This was an event that no one wanted to miss and it didn't disappoint.

 

The evening began with a goose bump-inducing reading of In Flanders Fields as read by Leonard Cohen. In the moment the recording played, every single person was connected and held captive by the powerful words, which continue to hold profound meaning for Canadians.

 

Lt. -Gen. Roméo Dallaire read a passage from In Flanders Fields: 100 Years: Writing on War, Loss and Remembrance (the anthology that all three speakers collaborated on) and provided the audience with the unexplored and emotional perspective of a commander who is responsible for other people's lives. He spoke about how the poem never hit home until the day he had to give orders to soldiers who ultimately died under his command. "The poem wasn't a poem anymore ... it was living ... the experience that this poem articulates is a responsibility for Captains. It's a responsibility to prepare soldiers to be effective and survive and a responsibility to carry the fact that those who don't come back are because of your orders." This poignant final sentence followed the tone set by Leonard Cohen's reading and added depth to the poem's meaning and our understanding of it.

 

Then Tim Cook began with a light-hearted anecdote about how In Flanders Fields was the only poem he had ever memorized but he noted although the poem always mattered to him, he had never thought about the man behind it until now. Cook humanized John McCrae. He was no longer simply the poet or the historical figure but "a leading young man in every sense." He was the healer who desperately wanted to go to war, the asthmatic who excelled in sports, and the humorous man who sang in a lunatic asylum "where the audience is not disposed to be particularly critical." However, he also carried the weight of the war with him and the "torch" of his poem resonates with grieving families who return to McCrae's words to soothe their scars and light the way forward.

 

Mary Janigan approached the poem in a different way—one that not many would think of. She spoke of the effect In Flanders Fields had on the 1917 election. Janigan admitted she initially, didn't see the connection until she read the last six lines of the poem. These lines were quoted to rally support for Sir Robert Borden who pushed for conscription.

 

However, the "poem was sent into battle and the enemy was Sir Wilfrid Laurier [who opposed conscription]." The resonance of the poem played a huge role in how the country almost broke up, illustrating how this poem can have many meanings across space and time.

 

The evening ended with a brief Question and Answer session where Dallaire, Cook, and Janigan spoke about the impact and meaning of World War I and why it's more memorable than World War II: "it affects every town and city in the country ... it's an Armageddon we can't get over that. It's the war that shook us. It changed us, it almost tore us apart ... it's the war we can't forget." Those final words bring us back to the chilling reading, which started the event and remind us of its call for remembrance and responsibility.

 

 

This evening, which was filled with different perspectives of a beloved poem, showed the audience that In Flanders Fields has many unexplored meanings. With every experience and every reading, new meanings may arise (I know I'll be reading it again with a new set of eyes). Ultimately, this poem will continue to resonate with us. 

Torrential rain and broken umbrellas didn't stop the excited audience from filling up the pews
in the cozy and brightly lit Centretown United Church. This was an event that no one wanted to 
miss and it didn't disappoint. 
The evening began with a goose bump-inducing reading of In Flanders Fields by Leonard Cohen. 
In the moment the recording played, every single person was connected and held captive by 
the powerful words, which continue to hold meaning for Canadians.  
Lt. -Gen. Roméo Dallaire read a passage from IN FLANDERS FIELDS: 100 YEARS: WRITING ON 
WAR, LOSS AND REMEBERANCE (the anthology that all three speakers collaborated on) and 
provided the audience with the unexplored and emotional perspective of a Commander who is 
responsible for other people's lives.  He spoke about how the poem never hit home until the 
day he had to give orders to soldiers who ultimately died under his command. "The poem 
wasn't a poem anymore ... it was living ... the experience that this poem articulates is a 
responsibility for Captains. It's a responsibility to prepare soldiers to be effective and survive 
and a responsibility to carry the fact that those who don't come back are because of your 
orders." This poignant final sentence followed the tone set by Leonard Cohen's reading and 
added depth to the poem's meaning and our understanding of it. 
Then Tim Cook began with a light-hearted anecdote about how In Flanders Fields was the only 
poem he had ever memorized but he noted although the poem always mattered to him, he had 
never thought about the man behind it until now. Cook humanized John McCrae. He was no 
longer simply the poet or the historical figure but "a leading young man in every sense." He was 
the healer who desperately wanted to go to war, the asthmatic who excelled in sports, and the 
humorous man who sang in a lunatic asylum "where the audience is not disposed to be 
particularly critical." However, he also carried the weight of the war with him and the "torch" of 
his poem resonates with grieving families who return to McCrae's words to soothe their scars 
and light the way forward. 
Mary Janigan approached the poem in a different way -- one that not many would think of. She 
spoke of the effect In Flanders Fields had on the 1917 election. Janigan admitted she initially, 
didn't see the connection until she read the last six lines of the poem. These lines were quoted 
to rally support for Sir Robert Borden who pushed for conscription. However, the "poem was 
sent into battle and the enemy was Sir Wilfrid Laurier [who opposed conscription]." The 
resonance of the poem played a huge role in how the country almost broke up, illustrating how 
this poem can have many meanings across space and time.
The evening ended with a brief Question and Answer session where Dallaire, Cook, and Janigan 
spoke about the impact and meaning of World War I and why it's more memorable  than World 
War II: "it affects every town and city in the country ... it's an Armageddon we can't get over 
that. It's the war that shook us. It changed us, it almost tore us apart ... it's the war we can't 
forget."   Those final words bring us back to the chilling reading, which started the event and 
remind us of its call for remembrance and responsibility. 
This evening, which was filled with different perspectives of a beloved poem, showed the 
audience that In Flanders Fields has many unexplored meanings. With every experience and 
every reading, new meanings may arise (I know I'll be reading it again with a new set of eyes). 
Ultimately, this poem will continue to resonate with us.